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Shape and Line Remix

For Grades 3–8

Sol LeWitt (American, 1928-2007). Wall Structure: Five Modules with One Cube, Black, 1965. Painted wood, 84 x 18 x 16 1/2 inches (213.4 x 45.7 x 41.9 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Gift of Robert Mangold and Sylvia Plimack Mangold, 1996. © 2010 The LeWitt Estate / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Table of Contents

Objectives
Materials
Introductory Activity: How an Idea Can Take Many Forms
Discussion
Activity: Geometry Becomes Art
Additional Activity (Optional)
New York State Learning Standards and Core Curriculum


OBJECTIVES

  • Students will understand how an idea can be a creative starting point
  • Students will understand how geometry can be a creative starting point
  • Students will create Sol LeWitt–inspired sculptures


Materials

  • Sol LeWitt Presentation
  • 8 1/2 x 11 white paper (or graph paper)
  • Pencils, bendable wire (such as bendaroos or pipe cleaners for youth, and wire for young adult)


INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITY: HOW AN IDEA CAN TAKE MANY FORMS

  • On an 8 1/2 x 11 piece of paper (or graph paper), ask your students to draw one of the following shapes with a pencil—square, triangle, or circle. Now ask your students to draw the exact same shape four more times (size, color, etc. should all be the same, but placement is up to the student).
  • Display all the drawings. As a class, come up with one title that describes all drawings, and could also be a title for each individual drawing. An example would be: Five Geometric Shapes on an 8 1/2 x 11 Piece of Paper. This title is the idea behind all the artworks.


DISCUSSION

Show the Sol LeWitt Presentation, Slides #2–8. Now discuss the students’ drawings again. What do they think is the artwork—the title or the drawings?


ACTIVITY: GEOMETRY BECOMES ART

  • Using bendable wire, have students create an open three-dimensional shape that is a version of shape that they drew earlier—a square becomes a cube; a circle becomes a sphere; a triangle becomes a pyramid.
  • After the three-dimensional shape is created, students can add more wire to finish their sculpture. Encourage them to view it from all sides and to make each viewpoint visually interesting.
  • Title each artwork.


ADDITIONAL ACTIVITY (OPTIONAL)

  • Have students create another sculpture with the same title as their first sculpture. Compare and contrast the two sculptures. How are they the same and how are they different? Discuss which they think is more important: the title or the sculptures.
  • Have each student trade titles with another student, who will create a sculpture with that title. Discuss which they think is more important: the title or the sculptures. Whose artwork is the sculpture—the student who created the title, the student who created the sculpture, or both?


NEW YORK STATE LEARNING STANDARDs and Core Curriculum

  • New York State Learning Standards for the Arts (Visual Arts, including the museum visit) 1, 2, 3, 4
  • New York State Learning Standard in Mathematics, Science and Technology 3
  • New York State Learning Standards for Mathematical Practice 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8
  • College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language 1, 3, 4, 5, 6
  • College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 (using the idea for the art as the informational text), 9, 10, 11 (New York only)
  • College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
  • College and Career Readiness Anchor Standard for Writing 2