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Past Exhibitions: 2004

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    • Franz West: Recent Sculptures

      October 21, 2004–October 16, 2005

      Franz West is one of Austria’s most highly regarded artists. He has spent his career rethinking the ways in which art is experienced and encourages viewers of his work to become active participants. For West, art is not about perfect form, but about finding a way to get around convention and articulate the psychological and physical sensibilities that make us uniquely human.

    • Cover to Cover: Works and Words at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery

      December 11, 2004–April 3, 2005

      Cover to Cover: Works and Words at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery explored the relationship between the written word and the artistic image by examining themes that highlight the variety of forms and media used in the production of contemporary “works on paper.” The works in this exhibition ranged from artists books and photography to etchings and lithography.

    • In Focus: Themes in Photography

      September 24, 2004–January 30, 2005

      In Focus: Themes in Photography examined the Gallery’s extensive collection of photographs through a thematic lens. Combining nineteenth-century historic works with recent acquisitions of contemporary photography, this exhibition highlighted the Gallery’s commitment to the photographic medium for more than nine decades, which began in 1910 with an exhibition of work by Alfred Stieglitz.

    • English Prints from the Collection

      June 26–December 13, 2004

      This exhibition comprised a selection of post-war English printmaking from the rich holdings of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s permanent collection. Artists such as Frank Auerbach, Patrick Caulfield, William Stanley Hayter, Barbara Hepworth, Patrick Heron, David Hockney, Howard Hodgkin, Magda McHale, Henry Moore, Ben Nicholson, Eduardo Paolozzi, Victor Pasmore, and Bridget Riley were featured.

    • Bodily Space: Works from the Permanent Collection

      July 17–October 17, 2004

      Bodily Space: Works from the Permanent Collection, a sequel to the Rodin installation, confirmed the relevance of Rodin’s innovations while demonstrating the remarkable variance of a figurative tradition since the turn of the last century.

    • Bodily Space: New Obsessions in Figurative Sculpture

      April 20–September 7, 2004

      Bodily Space: New Obsessions in Figurative Sculpture was a compelling counterpart to Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession. By exploring the cultural relevance of the figurative tradition in art, this exhibition addressed overlapping themes that Rodin tackled a century prior such as the effect of space, context, and size on one’s perception of the sculptural body; the fine line between humor and horror; the uneasy merging of biology and technology; and the continuing relevance of narrative drama and abstraction in contemporary art.

    • Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession-Sculpture from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation

      April 20–July 3, 2004

      The origin of modern sculpture begins with Rodin and the reaction he provoked by reconfiguring the human form. Before him, figurative sculpture had been wedded to the classical canons of beauty and form. No previous sculptor had envisioned or conceived the human figure as a fragmented or partial entity, nor had they explored sexuality and eros with such candid conviction.

    • Watercolors from The Collection

      March 6–June 13, 2004

      The Albright-Knox Art Gallery was pleased to present a selection of rarely seen watercolors from the Collection. The show included work by Milton Avery, Raoul Dufy, and Emil Nolde. There were also seventeenth-century watercolors from India and Persia featured.

    • Robert Motherwell and Frank Stella: Prints from the Permanent Collection

      March 6–June 13, 2004

      The Albright-Knox is renowned for its important collection of post-war American painting and sculpture. What is less known is that the museum also has a significant collection of post-war American prints. Two of America’s greatest printmakers, Robert Motherwell (1915-1991) and Frank Stella (born 1936), are particularly well represented.

    • John Beech from The Collection

      February 7–April 4, 2004

      John Beech is an artist who has captured international attention in both solo and group exhibitions. Well represented in both public and private collections throughout the United States, many of his works were recently acquired by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery. He converts manufactured goods into formal, aesthetic objects, calling himself “the everyday reductionist.”

    • Julie Mehretu: Drawing Into Painting

      January 24–March 28, 2004

      Julie Mehretu is a painter who makes large-scale, ultra dynamic canvases built up through a complicated series of acrylic layers on canvas overlaid with explorative, frenetic, markings. Her points of departure are architecture and the city, particularly the accelerated, compressed and highly dense urban environments of the twenty-first century.

    • Architecture into Form

      October 18, 2003–March 4, 2004

      In conjunction with Mori on Wright, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery mounted this exhibition, gleaned from the Gallery’s rich collection of sculpture, painting, and photographs.

    • Janine Antoni: Incarnate

      September 13, 2003–February 1, 2004

      Janine Antoni transforms the seemingly inconsequential and routine acts of living into tools for making art. She gives form to visceral experience. Incarnate brings together a selection of her recent works, exploring the way our mothers, both in a literal and ecological sense, form our existence.

    • Materials, Metaphors, Narratives

      October 4, 2003–January 4, 2004

      Materials, Metaphors, Narratives describes the work of six contemporary artists united by a common ethos. Petah Coyne, Lesley Dill, Ken Price, Tom Sachs, Jeanne Silverthorne, and Fred Tomaselli are object makers first and foremost.

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