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Special Event

Fifth Annual Cinegael Buffalo Film Festival

Presented by riverrun and Cinegael Buffalo

Friday, June 3, 2011, 12–10 pm

Auditorium

The fifth annual Cinegael Buffalo Film Festival features films from Ireland and imported special guests.

noon 
Film: One Hundred Mornings (2010)
Written and Directed by Conor Horgan; 90 minutes
This film about surviving complete societal breakdown won the IFTA (Irish Film and Television Academy) Award for Best Cinematography in 2010. It was filmed in County Wicklow. 

2 pm
Film: 32A (2007)
Written and Directed by Marian Quinn; 90 minutes
This film about girls coming of age in Dublin won the IFTA Award for Best Cinematography in 2009. It was also nominated for Best Film at the IFTA Awards. 

4 pm
Film: I Went Down (1997)
Directed by Paddy Breathnach; 107 minutes
This Irish gangland comedy—written by Conor McPherson and starring Brendan Gleeson—won numerous international awards, including the IFTA Award for Best Screenplay in 2009. It was also nominated for Best Film at the IFTA Awards. 

6 pm
Film: The Eclipse (2009)
Written and Directed by Conor McPherson; 90 minutes
In a seaside Irish town, a widower sparks with a visiting horror novelist while he begins to believe he is seeing ghosts. The film was written by Conor McPherson, who has also written the plays The Weir and Shining City, which runs at the Irish Classical Theatre Company through May 22. It won IFTA Awards for Best Film and Best Screenplay in 2010. It was filmed in Cobh, County Cork.

7:45 pm
Two Short Films: The Crush (2010) and Shoe (2010)
The Crush (15 minutes) was written and directed by Micheal Creagh; it was nominated for Best Live Action Short Film in the 2011 Academy Awards. Shoe (13 minutes) was written and directed by Nick Kelly; it was on the shortlist for Best Live Action Short Film in the 2011 Academy Awards. 

8:15 pm
Lecture: Heyward Ehrlich on "The Movies in Ireland to Ireland in the Movies: The First Decade, 1896–1906"
Four months after the formal introduction of movies in Paris in December 1896, films began to arrive in Ireland; by 1900, six different film producers had already worked in Dublin. Since most early films do not survive, the recently unearthed cache of more than eight hundred short films made by Mitchell & Kenyon around 1900 is a gold mine. The third largest archive of early films, exceeded only by Edison and Lumière, it includes twenty-seven films made in Ireland around 1902, all now restored and published on DVD. Heyward Ehrlich is Professor Emeritus of the Department of English, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

Part of M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY

On the First Friday of every month—from 10 am to 10 pm—admission to the Gallery's Collection, and to most events and performances, is free for everyone. See full schedule for Friday, June 3, 2011