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Gordon B. Washburn

Table of Contents

 
Collection Overview
Information for Users

Preferred Citation
Terms of Access and Use
Copyright

Administrative Information

Acquisition Information
Processing Information

Biographical Note
Scope and Content Note
Arrangement
Container List
Search Terms

Contributors
Subject Terms

Associated Material

Separated Material
Related Resources


 
Collection Overview
 

 
Title:
Gordon B. Washburn Records, 1932-1941 

Collection number:
AK2.5 

Creator:
Washburn, Gordon B. (Gordon Bailey), 1904- 

Extent:
48 manuscript boxes (24 linear feet) 

Language of Material:
Collection material in English. 

Repository:
Albright-Knox Art Gallery. G. Robert Strauss, Jr. Memorial Library 

Abstract:
Records of Gordon B. Washburn, director of the Albright Art Gallery from 1931, through 1942, including correspondence regarding Gallery matters and records of government sponsored art programs Washburn administered as a local chairman. 


 
Information for Users
 

 
Preferred Citation
[Description and dates], Box/folder number, AK2.5, Gordon B. Washburn Records, 1932-1941, G. Robert Strauss, Jr. Memorial Library, Albright-Knox Art Gallery. 

Terms of Access and Use
The bulk of the Gordon B. Washburn Records are open for research. See Head of Research Resources for specific access and restrictions. 

Copyright
Copyright is held by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery. Additional copyright may be held by individual artists/authors, their heirs, or assigns. Researchers must obtain the written permission of the holder(s) of copyright and the G. Robert Strauss, Jr. Memorial Library before publishing quotations from materials in the collection.


 
Administrative Information
 

 
Acquisition Information
See Head of Research Resources for acquisition information. 

Processing Information
Collection processed by: John D. Sandford, 1985. Finding aid revised by Karen Morse, Susana Tejada, and Sheryl Saxby, 2006.

Finding aid encoded by: Sheryl Saxby, June 2006. Encoding revised by Amy Vilz, August 2008.


 
Biographical Note

 
Gordon Bailey Washburn (1904-1983) was born and raised in Massachusetts. He graduated from Williams College and subsequently traveled in Europe, returning to study under Professor Paul J. Sachs of the Fogg Art Museum. He received his Master of Fine Arts degree from Harvard. His first position in a long career of museum administration was at the Albright Art Gallery, where he succeeded William M. Hekking as art director on October 1, 1931.

From the beginning of his tenure at the Albright Art Gallery, Washburn sought to implement programs designed to increase the usefulness of the Gallery to the majority of the public. It was under his direction that the first educational secretaries (coordinators) were hired followed by the appointment of Robert T. Davis as the first director of education in 1936. Similar growth of departments designed for serving the public included the Library (founded in 1932), the Picture Lending Library (founded in 1933), and a Department of Allied Art and Industry (founded in 1934), which was intended to foster links between manufacturers, retailers, and the Gallery through training in art appreciation for sales girls.

The changing needs of the public during the Great Depression spurred the implementation of educational outreach programs, school tours, and adult education classes. Washburn himself lectured before a variety of audiences in upstate New York, as well as arranging for a full series of lectures each year at the Gallery.

His two largest and best received exhibitions were Master Drawings (1935) and Master Bronzes (1937). Both were scholarly and considered innovative for the manner of their installation. In 1934, Washburn initiated the first independently-juried Western New York regional exhibition as a fair response to rivalry among local artists' societies.

Washburn's most lasting contribution to the history of the permanent collection was the establishment of the Room of Contemporary Art in December 1938. Funded largely by Seymour H. Knox II, the Room for Contemporary Art was governed by an innovative and experimental collecting policy which permitted the collection and exhibition of contemporary art from many countries for the benefit and enlightenment of the public.

Washburn resigned as director in 1942 to become director of the Rhode Island School of Art's museum. In the early fifties he became director of the Carnegie Institute Department of Fine Arts in Pittsburgh. In 1962 he resigned to head the Asia House Gallery in New York, a position from which he retired in 1972. He died in New York City in 1983.


 
Scope and Content Note

 
Please note:
Washburn's correspondence from October through December of 1931 is located in AK2.4, William M. Hekking Director's Records.

The bulk of the Gordon B. Washburn Director's Records consists of correspondence.

The relatively larger volume of records surviving from Washburn's administration in comparison with that of his predecessors is a reflection of the expansion of both the number of staff, and the variety of programs offered by the Gallery beginning in 1932. From his correspondence it is clear that Washburn dictated most of his letters, and routine communications were written and signed for him by his stenographers led by Beatrice Howe, Washburn's assistant director. Types of correspondence found in Series II include material documenting the growing educational function of the Gallery, particularly records relating to Gallery cooperation with public schools, and the University of Buffalo, and also the administration of a 1939 Carnegie Foundation grant which founded the Secondary School Project, a diverse series of exhibitions aimed at young adults.

Correspondence with visiting lecturers documents this aspect of the Gallery's education function. Another major category is correspondence with art collectors and dealers, most based in New York City. Much of this material relates to loans, purchases, and works considered for purchase. Correspondence documenting the acquisition of art for the permanent collection and the Room of Contemporary Art was found, but it is noted that final correspondence documenting an acquisition is filed in the Registrar's Office. Correspondence in the Directors' Office record the decision to buy, while material in the Registrar files record the actual purchase. Washburn corresponded frequently about art with his former professor, Paul J. Sachs and his assistant, Agnes Mongan. This correspondence concern the quality and provenance of art under purchase consideration, discusses the reliability of dealers, and also records Washburn's personal life in Buffalo.

Another frequent personal correspondent was Stephan Bourgeois, a European who established the Bourgeois Gallery in New York. Washburn's correspondence with this significant, but little known art dealer and scholar who pioneered in New York representing the French avant garde artists, is quite voluminous and comprehensive and continues in a complete series from 1931 to 1942. Bourgeois was involved in the organization of the Room of Contemporary Art and served as its New York representative in 1939 and 1940 advising on many purchases. He lectured several times at the Gallery, and his wife, Maria Theresa, who was a pupil of Isadora Duncan, danced in the sculpture court before an elite audience in 1932. Bourgeois' correspondence provides an interesting behind-the-scenes account of the factors and events affecting the New York art world in the thirties.

Correspondence with other museum directors concerns circulating exhibition, loans, policies, and documents planning for major events, such as the New York World's Fair and similar expositions. This includes regular correspondence with practically every art museum in the United States. Museum correspondence is arranged alphabetically by city. Correspondence with artists was also found. This included both local artists of interest and isolated letters from internationally recognized artists such as Fernaud Leger, Naum Gabo, and Josef Albers, and American artists like Walt Kuhn. Correspondence with local artists between 1932 and 1934 sheds light on Buffalo art activities particularly affairs involving the Buffalo Society of Artists and its splinter group, the Patteran Society.


 
Arrangement

 
The Gordon B. Washburn Director's Records are divided into two series.

Series I consists of correspondence and administrative records of successive government-sponsored art projects which Washburn administered as a local chairman. For convenience these are referred to as Federal Art Projects Records. The Federal Art Projects records as found had apparently been culled from the general office records (located in Series II).

In addition to documenting mural project and other public works art commissioned during the Depression, these records also provide significant details about "blue collar" and clerical relief employment at the Albright from 1933 to 1942. Many jobs now performed by full-time staff were originally filled with relief workers and it is generally true that the modern departmental system began in the thirties.

Series II as found consisted of 36 linear feet of shelved office files. During processing only duplicate copies, invoices, acknowledgement cards for publications received, and purchase orders were discarded.


 
Container List

 
Series I. Works Progress Administration Federal Arts Projects Records, 1932-1942
Scope and content: Series I consists of correspondence and administrative records of successive government-sponsored art projects which Washburn administered as a local chairman. For convenience these are referred to as Federal Art Projects Records. The Federal Art Projects records as found had apparently been culled from the general office records (located in Series II).

 In addition to documenting mural project and other public works art commissioned during the Depression, these records also provide significant details about "blue collar" and clerical relief employment at the Albright from 1933 to 1942. Many jobs now performed by full-time staff were originally filled with relief workers and it is generally true that the modern departmental system began in the thirties.

Arrangement: Series is arranged chronologically.

1.1

Early Work Relief Projects, 1932-1934; contains correspondence documenting work projects involving the Gallery sponsored by the Mayor's Committee on Unemployment and the State of New York Temporary Emergency Relief Administration Emergency Work Bureau of Buffalo.
   **Note: Principle correspondence is with Julius F. Stone, consultant and coordinator of the Mayor's Committee and the Buffalo Emergency Work Bureau. Includes studies of employment possibilities at the Gallery conducted by the Mayor's Committee in 1932. Later correspondence documents the hiring of E.R.A. workers.

1.2

Public Works of Art Project Records, December 1933-November 1934; consists of correspondence and administrative records including administrative and personal correspondence with Julius Stone, billing and financial correspondence concerning the acquisition of supplies, and lists of mural projects in the Buffalo area.

1.3

Public Works of Art Project: Press Releases from Washington, DC, 1933-1934; includes account of the origins of the P.W.A.P. and descriptions of P.W.A.P. project in the 16 national regions.

1.4

Works Progress Administration and Buffalo Emergency Relief Bureau: Professional and clerical projects at the Gallery, 1934; includes completed W.P.A. project proposal forms and lists of employees hired.

1.5

Works Progress Administration: Federal Art Project, 1935-1936; minutes, correspondence and other records documenting the implementation of the F.A.P. in Buffalo; includes minutes of the Buffalo Emergency Relief Bureau Art Committee (September-October 1935) and lists of artists enrolled in projects.

1.6

Treasury Relief Art Project: United States Marine Hospital Mural Competition, c. March 1935-March 1936

1.7

Blue Prints of the United States Marine Hospital used in the administration of the mural project, c. 1935

1.8

Treasury Relief Art Project: Binghampton, New York Post Office Building Mural Competition, 1936-1939

1.9

Blue Prints of the Binghampton Post Office Building used in the administration of the mural project, c. 1936

2.1

Works Progress Administration: Buffalo Projects, 1936-1937

2.2

Works Progress Administration: Buffalo Projects Correspondence, 1937

2.3

United States Treasury Department Procurement Division, Section of Fine Arts, 1937-1938; miscellaneous project correspondence.

2.4

Works Progress Administration: Projects correspondence, 1938

2.5

Works Progress Administration: Federal Art Project Index of American Design exhibition correspondence, 1938-1939

2.6

Works Progress Administration: Buffalo projects correspondence, 1939

2.7

Federal Works Agency: Works Progress Administration art projects correspondence, 1940

2.8

Federal Works Agency: Works Progress Administration artistic and educational projects at the Gallery, 1941

2.9

Federal Works Agency: Works Progress Administration of New York State professional, clerical, and educational projects at the Gallery, 1941

2.10

Federal Works Agency: Works Progress Administration of New York State, 1942

 

Series II. Records and General Correspondence
Arrangement: Records originally maintained by director's office staff alphabetically by subject for each year.

**Please note: Institutions were often filed alphabetically by geographic location and will have a separate folder for each year.

1932

3.1

"A," 1932; includes Ainslee Galleries (New York), American Art Association, Anderson Galleries (New York), American Institute for Persian Art and Archaeology.

3.2

Association of Art Museum Directors: annual convention, 1932

3.3

"B," 1932; includes Bachstitz Gallery (New York) regarding possible purchase of an El Greco, Baltimore Museum of Art regarding lectures by Waldemar Lessing, Holburne of Menstrie Museum (Bath, England), Alon Bement, Boston Museum of Fine Arts regarding lecture by Jean Capart, Joseph Brummer, and Carl Bredemeier regarding gallery opening announcement.

3.4

Stephan Bourgeois, Bourgeois Galleries (New York), 1932; regarding "stage art" exhibitions, Art in Industry in Buffalo opening event, Gallery collecting policy, and possible purchase of Van Gogh's The Zoave.

3.5

Stephan Bourgeois: lecture at Gallery, May 1932; also contains information on a lecture by Richard Bach.

3.6

Brooklyn Museum: correspondence, 1932

3.7

Buffalo Centennial Exposition, 1932; contains minutes of the Centennial Program Exhibits Committee meetings (September-October 1932), correspondence regarding a poster design competition, and related publications

3.8

Buffalo Painters and Sculptors Benefit Exhibition: Gallery involvement, 1932

3.9

Buffalo Broadcasting Company: Gallery art appreciation radio talks, 1932

3.10

"C," 1932

3.11

Cambridge: Fogg Art Museum, 1932; correspondence with Paul Sachs, concerns works of art the Gallery was considering purchasing, the establishment of a slide collection, and print collection accessioning and cataloging methods.

3.12

Jean Capart: lecture at Gallery, April 4, 1932; also includes correspondence with Ashton Sanborn.

3.13

Chicago, Art Institute: correspondence, 1932

3.14

Cleveland Museum of Art: correspondence, 1932

3.15

College Art Association (New York), 1932; contains information on lecturers and the 1925 Bourdelle Exhibition organized by A. Conger Goodyear, documents arrangements for exhibitions, also includes various CAA documents.

3.16

Thomas Craven: lecture at Gallery, October 13, 1932; also includes correspondence with Charles Pearson of the W. Colston Leigh Lecture Bureau.

3.17

"D," 1932; includes correspondence with Esther L. Day regarding lecture program, Dayton Art Institute regarding the art loan program, G. Del Drago regarding loans of medieval art, Downtown Gallery, Valentine Dudensing, Duveen Brothers, Eugene Dyczkowski, and regarding Danish National Exhibition

3.18

Detroit Institute of Arts, 1932; includes correspondence with director William Valentiner concerning recommendations for staff position as well as correspondence with Walter Heil, curator of European Art, concerning a lecture at the Gallery.

3.19

Detroit Publishing Company: reproductions correspondence, 1932; concerns postcards and prints of Gallery-owned art and ownership of copyright, also contains brochures with images of popular work since deaccessioned.

3.20

Paul Dengler, Carnegie visiting lecturer, May 9, 1932

4.1

"E," 1932; includes correspondence with Ehrich Galleries regarding the provenance of Cezanne's Jas de Bouffan, John Ganson Evans regarding loan of bust by Jo Davidson, and Eastman Kodak Company.

4.2

Alvin Eastman (Gallery staff researcher): correspondence, 1932

4.3

Education Programs and Ideas, 1932; also contains information on radio lectures and lectures at the Gallery, the early history of art education at the University of Buffalo, education programs at the Buffalo Science Museum.

4.4

"F," 1932; includes correspondence with Felix Feneon (Parisian art dealer) offering post-impressionist and cubist artworks, Ferargil Galleries regarding the Oscar Davisson Exhibition, and Formes magazine regarding publication of Galley acquisitions.

4.5

Fleischman Gallery (Munich), 1932; correspondence with Rudolf Heinemann-Fleischmann regarding possible purchase of a work by Goya and works by Wilhelm Lehmbruck.

4.6

French Lecture Course, 1932-1933; "A Century of French Art," a study course conducted by Washburn and members of the Gallery education staff.

4.7

"G," 1932; includes correspondence with Marcel Guerrin (Parisian dealer) regarding possible purchase of Renoir's La Fillette au Cerceau, and Peter Gow regarding Gallery educational activities.

4.8

"H," 1932; includes correspondence with Ellen Halweis regarding Washburn's lecture at PS 19, George Hare (commercial photographer), Marie Harriman Gallery, Mrs. J. Havens regarding her life with Seneca chief Strong, Hanovia Ultra-violet Lamp Co. regarding use of U-V lamps to detect forgeries, and H. Hanton (Parisian art dealer).

4.9

"I," 1932; includes letter from Chief Ewing Flying Iron concerning possible lecture recitals of Indian music.

4.10

"J," 1932 ; includes correspondence with K.M. Jamgotchian (an oriental rug and tapestry dealer) regarding loan to Gallery, and Sherman Jewett regarding Josiah Jewett's involvement with the Buffalo Fine Arts Academy.

4.11

"K," 1932; includes correspondence with Spencer Kellogg, Jr concerning gift to Gallery and Gallery exhibition policy regarding one-man shows and Norman Kent (wood engraver).

4.12

M. Knoedler and Company (New York), 1932; correspondence concerning various artworks sent to the Gallery on approval, including a Tiepolo, and prints by Toulouse-Lautrec.

4.13

"L," 1932; includes correspondence Tom La Farge regarding water color exhibition of works completed in Mexico, joint exhibition with Olin Dowes and Mary Plimpton, Julian Levy Gallery (New York) regarding loan of photographs by D.O. Hill, C.T. Loo (oriental art dealer), and Alice M. Lielman regarding her collection of Stieglitz photographs.

4.14

Library Activities, 1932; includes information on the remodeling of a gallery for accommodation of new art reference library, E.B. Green and Son, architects. Also contains correspondence with E.B. Green concerning Gallery heat plant changes and a letter from E.M. Fantl of the Museum of Modern Art about furniture design by Mies van der Rohe and Thonet and Le Corbusier.

4.15

Erika Lohman: "Creative Child Art" lecture at Gallery, December 9, 1932

4.16

"M," 1932; includes correspondence with Hermon A. MacNeil regarding his statue of Washington exhibition in the 1916 American Sculpture Exhibition, Mrs. Mathew D. Mann regarding gift of two volumes of German etchings, artist Irving Manoir, and regarding military prints by Currier and Ives received from 174th Infantry Armory (Buffalo) for exhibition.

4.17

Macbeth Galleries (New York), 1932

5.1

"N," 1932; includes National Alliance of Art in Industry (New York), National Recreation Association (New York) children's programs at Gallery, J. B. Neumann (New York) regarding proposed German art exhibition, New York Telephone Company, Josephine Nicholls, and "Progress of American Art" lecture given by Washburn to the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution (April 25, 1932).

5.2

New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1932; contains information of educational work at American museums, the purchase of slides for the Gallery slide collection, and Emergency Relief Bureau workers at the Gallery.

5.3

New York, Museum of Modern Art, 1932; correspondence with A. Conger Goodyear (president) and Alfred Barr, Jr. (director); includes material on Gallery loans to MOMA exhibitions.

5.4

"O," 1932; includes correspondence with Baron Max von Oppenheim (lecturer).

5.5

"P," 1932; includes correspondence with Georgette Passedoit (modern art dealer, New York), Philip N. Youtz (Pennsylvania Museum of Art), and the Progressive Education Association (New York).

5.6

Publicity and radio talk information, 1932

5.7

"R," 1932; includes Rochester Memorial Art Gallery and Charles E. Roesch (mayor of Buffalo) regarding benefit exhibition organized by Gallery for poor Buffalo artists. [See folder 3.8]

5.8

Reproduction and copyright correspondence, 1932

5.9

Radio talks sponsored by Gallery, 1932; includes transcripts

6.1

"S," 1932

6.2

Science Museum, Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences: correspondence, 1932

6.3

F.R. Sheffield: library book acquisitions, 1932

6.4

Eugene G. Steinhof: lecture at Gallery, 1932; includes correspondence with E.B. Green about Steinhof and a detailed letter from F.H. Taylor (director, Worcester Art Museum).

6.5

"T," 1932; includes correspondence with Town Tidings (Buffalo weekly journal), Toledo Museum of Art concerning authentication of an ancient glass plate, Toronto Star Weekly regarding reproductions of Gallery art, and Buffalo Times (George Kolbe - city editor).

6.6

Maria Theresa: dance recital, December 2, 1932; includes autographed brochures, press releases, and correspondence. [Theresa was the wife of New York art scholar and dealer, Stephan Bourgeois, and a pupil of interpretive dancer Isadora Duncan]

6.9

"U," 1932

6.8

University of Buffalo (Samuel Capen): lecture cooperation with Gallery, 1932

6.7

"V," 1932; includes correspondence with Robert C. Vose (dealer, Boston) and the Volunteer Service Committee (Buffalo).

6.10

"W," 1932

6.11

Worcester Art Museum: correspondence, 1932

6.12

Washington, DC: American Association of Museums, 1932

6.13

Washington, DC: American Federation of Arts, 1932

6.14

Frank Lloyd Wright: lecture at Gallery, November 10, 1932; includes news clippings, brochures and contract information as well as a short letter from Wright and correspondence with his lecture agent, W. Colston Leigh. [Lecture held in conjunction with the Modern Architecture Exhibition]

6.15

"X, Y, Z," 1932

 

1933

7.1

"Aa-Al," 1933; includes correspondence with J.N. Adam and Co. (Buffalo) president Brunmark concerning art classes for salespeople and buyers and Washburn's Chamber of Commerce award as well as J.N Adam Memorial Hospital regarding the status of loans from permanent collection.

7.2

"Am-Ar," 1933; includes correspondence with American Academy of Arts and Letters regarding the loan of Brush portraits from Gallery collection, American Institute of Persian Art and Archaeology regarding Emergency Relief Bureau employment of museum personnel, American Librarians' Agency regarding the hiring of librarians for Gallery library, and the 74th Armory (Buffalo) regarding indefinitely loan from the permanent collection.

7.3

Art Extension Society: reproductions correspondence, 1933

7.4

"As-Az," 1933;

7.5

A. Everett Austin: lecture in conjunction with Italian baroque exhibition, January 6, 1933

7.6

"Ba-Bar," 1933

7.7

Richard F. Bach: lecture, "Contemporary Design--The Shaping Style," November 17, 1933

7.8

"Be-Bh," 1933

7.9

"Bi-Bn," 1933; includes letter from artist Edwin Blashfield and telegram from Emil Bistran (Taos Group artist) regarding Heptagon exhibition.

7.10

"Bo-Bq," 1933

7.11

Stephan Bourgeois: "Children and Artists" lecture and general correspondence, 1933; includes correspondence regarding the New York art market and dealers, Rodin, purchases by Buffalo collectors, shipping of art to Gallery on approval (including a Modigliani), disposition of works in the collection (including the sale of Rodin bronzes), and the early purchases of Seymour Knox.

7.12

Boston Museum of Fine Arts: correspondence, 1933

7.13

"Bra-Brn," 1933; includes correspondence with Carl Bredemeier concerning works by local artists.

7.14

"Bro-Bt," 1933; includes correspondence with the Joseph Brummer Gallery and Mrs. George de Forest Brush concerning Brush's Buffalo portraits and the sale of the Albright estate.

7.15

Brooklyn Museum (Philip Youtz, assistant director), 1933

7.16

"Bu-Bz," 1933; includes information on Buffalo Evening News art criticism competition organized by the Buffalo Society of Artists (prize sponsored by Maulsby Kimball) and Blanche A. Byerly Lecture Bureau brochures.

7.17

Buffalo Institutions: correspondence," 1933; includes Masten Park High School regarding indefinite loan status, Buffalo Museum of Science, Grosvenor Library, Buffalo Civic Music Committee regarding concerts at Gallery, Buffalo City Planning Association, and Junior Chamber of Commerce concerning award to Washburn.

7.18

Buffalo Society of Artists: 39th Annual Exhibition at the Gallery, 1932-1934; includes correspondence with local artists, BSA secretary Eugene Dyczkowski, and BSA president Alexander O. Levy, as well as a copy of a letter to the editor of the Buffalo Evening News and a copy of an "open" letter explaining decision to initiate an Annual Western New York exhibition due to the split between BSA and Patteran Society views; also contains catalogues and notices of exhibition.

7.19

"Ca," 1933

7.20

Cambridge, Fogg Art Museum, 1933; correspondence with Paul J. Sachs.

7.21

"Ce-Cn," 1933

7.22

Chicago, Art Institute: correspondence, 1932-1933; includes information on Gallery loans to the 1933 Century of Progress Exposition and Washburn's November 1933 lecture at the Art Institute.

8.1

Cleveland Museum of Art, 1933

8.2

"Coa-Con," 1933

8.3

College Art Association (New York), 1933

8.4

"Coo-Cq," 1933; includes correspondence with Thomas Cowles concerning survey of Gallery library, library history, and acquisitions. Also includes first annual report of the library.

8.5

"Cr-Ct," 1933; includes Creative Art magazine.

8.6

"Da-Dh," 1933; includes correspondence with Maud Dale (New York collector), Mrs. V.B. Dold concerning lecture by Washburn, Mr. Drew-Bear concerning radio talk on the history of American taverns, George H. Drake concerning Gallery radiator installment, Laura DeVinney (director, Art Department, State Normal School, Fredonia) regarding use of Gallery child art exhibit, and Edward Dufner (loan correspondence); also includes Auguste V. Desclos (lecturer) brochures.

8.7

Dayton Art Institute, 1933

8.8

Missing

8.9

Detroit Institute of Arts, 1933

8.10

Downtown Gallery (New York), 1933

8.11

"E," 1933; includes monthly statistical summary of educational activities, Alvin C. Eastman (American Institute for Persian Art and Archaeology) concerning the purchase of a Jain figure from Brummer Galleries.

8.12

Ehrich Galleries (New York), 1933

8.13

John Ganson Evans and Evans family, 1933; includes correspondence concerning art in Mexico and the influence of Diego Rivera.

8.14

"F," 1933; includes correspondence with Juliana Force (Whitney Museum of Art)

8.15

"G," 1933; includes letter from Arturo Grassi (Florence) with pencil note on verso to William Warren Smith (Buffalo Fine Arts Academy) concerning the purchase of Lorenzo Di Credi's Adoration of Christ.

8.16

Jane Gaston (applicant for the position of educational secretary), January-March 1933; includes information on a lecture at the Gallery on Gauguin and Van Gogh (March 6, 1933). Correspondence documents sex discrimination in museum hiring practices in the 1930s.

8.17

Grand Rapids, Michigan Public Library, 1933; loans of books for exhibition of rare books and manuscripts.

8.18

"H," 1933; includes correspondence with Wadsworth Athenaeum (Hartford) regarding loan of Picasso's La Toilette, Marie Harriman (art dealer, New York), William M. Hekking regarding works loaned to MOMA and files taken when Hekking resigned as art director in 1931, Agnes R. Henderson (New York) regarding the Buffalo Civic Orchestra, and Evan Hollister regarding the estate of Susan Albright.

9.1

Halftone Sale: correspondence, June 1933; copper-plate halftones sold to artists of works in Gallery collection. Artists include: Lilian Genth, Charles Haag, Daniel Garber, Ernest L. Blumenschein, Albert P. Lucas, Catherine Wright, Sargeant Kendall, Katherine Dreier, and Herman Dudley Murphy.

9.2

"I," 1933; includes correspondence with Francis B. Ingersoll regarding disposition of a Thomas LeClear portrait bequeathed to the Buffalo Fine Arts Academy, Institute of International Education lecturers, International Press Cutting Bureau (London) with a news clipping from the Daily Telegraph (December 4, 1933) concerning the Picture Lending Library, and International School of Art (Vienna).

9.3

"J," 1933

9.4

"K," 1933; includes William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art (Kansas City) director Paul Gardner regarding activities of Nora Christenson (Gallery director of education), Spencer Kellogg (Paris) regarding loans to Gallery, Helen H. Kendall (lecturer hired to instruct department store salespeople), and Mulsby Kimball, Jr. regarding summer art classes in East Aurora.

9.5

Rockwell Kent, 1933-1934; correspondence concerns Kent's design of a bookplate for the Gallery and his gift of a block of wood block cutting and information on lecture at Gallery (including lecture brochure with self-portrait).

9.6

M. Knoedler and Company (New York), 1933; purchase of English portraits for Grace M. Knox.

9.7

"L," 1933; includes League of Composers, Raymond Petit (lecturer).

9.8

Colston Leigh Lecture Bureau, 1933; correspondence and brochures.

9.9

John Levey Galleries (New York), 1933; list of works for disposition from the Gallery collection by exchange [lists name sources for original acquisition].

9.10

Library construction: North Wing, 1933; documents Knox contributions and includes an artist's drawing of the library, builders specifications, and correspondence with E.B. Green

9.11

C.T. Loo, oriental art dealer (New York), 1933

9.12

Eustache deLorey: lecture at Gallery, February 1933

9.13

"M," 1933; includes correspondence with Pierre Matisse regarding possible purchase of Degas' La Coiffure.

9.14

Robert W. Macbeth, art dealer (New York), 1933

10.1

"Music:" correspondence relating to the free Saturday afternoon concerts given by the Buffalo Civic Orchestra at the Gallery, October 1932-December 1933; contains correspondence with the Buffalo Civic Music Committee, National Music League (New York), architect Edward B. Green, Julliard School (New York), and Walter Damrosch; includes press releases, programs, information on the reorganization of the Buffalo Symphony Orchestra, emergency work relief for musicians, and Buffalo Fine Arts Academy subscriptions to underwrite cost of performance.

10.2

"N," 1933; includes correspondence with National Alliance of Art and Industry concerning staff hiring during the depression, Niagara Lithograph Company regarding loans from the collection, National Recovery Administration, and Newark Museum regarding the Gallery Depression employment practices.

10.3

New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1933

10.4

New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1933; correspondence with Alfred Barr, Alan R. Blackburn, and A. Conger Goodyear concerning circulating exhibitions of works by Maurice Stern, local Western New York artists, and Whistler's Mother. Also concerns conflict between local artists' groups and Mrs. Maud (Chester) Dale's private collection.

10.5

"O," 1933

10.6

"P," 1933; includes correspondence with Harold Woodbury Parsons (art expert) regarding the purchase of a Piazetta from Italico Brass and brochures and information from the Polish Week of Hospitality Committee, International Century of Progress Exposition (Chicago, 1933).

10.7

Publicity and press releases (written by Walter Gordon, publicity assistant)," 1933

10.8

"R," 1933; correspondence includes E.J. Ruehl (secretary to Mayor Charles Roesch), David Rosen (art restorer and scholar, New York) concerning drawings by Bellini considered for purchase from the John Levy Gallery, and Dexter P. Rumsey regarding Gallery insurance.

10.9

Radio talks sponsored by Gallery, 1933; includes transcripts.

10.10

Reproductions and copyright correspondence, 1933

10.11

Rudolf Meyer Riefstahl: lecture, October 1933

10.12

Rochester Memorial Art Gallery, 1933; includes correspondence concerning the first Western New York exhibition and local art societies; also includes information on artists represented in the Gallery collection (ca. 1933) and proposed Maurice Stern exhibition at Gallery.

11.1

"S," 1933; includes correspondence with Scientific Art Research Laboratory, Anthony Sisti (local artist), and Marie Sterner Gallery (New York).

11.2

Maurice Sachs: lecture, November 1, 1933

11.3

Arnold Seligmann, Rey and Company, 1933; correspondence with Paul M. Byk.

11.4

Jacques Seligmann and Company, 1933

11.5

Syracuse Museum of Fine Arts, 1933

11.6

"T," 1933; includes correspondence with August Thibaudeau (photographer, Niagara Falls), Trend (Buffalo weekly journal) concerning text of radio talk by Washburn, Town Tidings (Buffalo weekly) about activities at the Gallery.

11.7

Toledo Museum of Art, 1933

11.8

"U," 1933

11.9

University of Michigan Ann Arbor: lecture correspondence, 1933

11.10

"V," 1933

11.11

William R. Valentiner: lecture, March 17, 1933 [also judge of the first Western New York exhibition]

11.12

"W," 1933

11.13

Washington, DC: American Federation of Arts, 1933; correspondence concerning a Matisse exhibition.

11.14

Wildenstein and Company (New York), 1933

11.15

"Y," 1933

11.16

"Z," 1933

 

1934

12.1

"A," 1934; includes correspondence Addison Gallery of American Art (Andover) regarding the organization of Women's Advisory Committee exhibition Art in Industry (1933) and information about American Academy of Arts (New York), architects and builders exhibits, and an Art News article about the Gallery (June 9, 1934).

12.2

Josef Albers (Black Mountain College, North Carolina), 1934; correspondence regarding possible exhibition of woodcuts.

12.3

Allied Art and Merchandizing conference (Stadtler Hotel); contains administrative notes, lecture brochures, copy of Outlook and Independent magazine (November 26, 1930).

12.4

"B," 1934; includes letters from local artists Raphael Beck and Carl Bredemeier.

12.5

Carl F. Biele: construction of display cases, 1934

12.6

Stepham Bourgeois, 1934; correspondence concerning landscapes by Claude Lorrain, the activities of various New York art dealers, and the framing of works by Luca Della Robbia and Lorenzo di Credi.

12.7

Brooklyn Museum (Philip N. Youtz, director), 1934

12.8

Joseph Brummer Gallery (New York), 1934

12.9

W.S. Budworth and sons: shipping of works of art, 1934

12.10

Buffalo institutions: correspondence, 1934; includes Mayor's City Planning Board, City Federation of Women's Clubs, Board of Education, Chamber of Commerce, Council of Social Agencies, Buffalo Public Library, Buffalo Community Orchestra, and Buffalo Evening News.

12.11

Buffalo Museum of Science: cooperation with Gallery, 1934

12.12

Buffalo Society of Artists (Eugene Dyczkowski, secretary), 1934; information on BSA exhibitions at the Gallery, an analysis of 109 exhibitors in the first Western New York exhibition by club membership, and BSA criticisms of exhibition concept.

12.13

"C," 1934; includes correspondence with Alithea Cary regarding Master Drawings Exhibition, Nora L. Christnson regarding Gallery activities during the director's absence, and Carnegie Corporation (F.P. Keppel, president).

12.14

Chautauqua Institution, Buffalo Committee, 1934

12.15

Chicago, Art Institute: loans to Century of Progress exposition, 1934

12.16

Alfred V. Churchill (Northampton, Massachusetts), 1934; correspondence relates to a work by Gericault and mentions a "museum plan" developed by Washburn; other topics of correspondence include American art scholars Forbes Watson and Paul J. Sachs, and the Gallery's collecting policy and Washburn's plans for developing the collection.

12.17

Cincinnati Art Museum, 1934; includes information on the Hiram Powers exhibitions and correspondence concerning membership policies.

12.18

Cleveland Museum of Art, 1934

12.19

William S. Coffin, president, Metropolitan Museum (New York), 1934; correspondence with E.B. Green concerning a lecture at the Gallery.

12.20

College Art Association (New York), 1934

12.21

"D," 1934

13.1

Robert T. Davis, Gallery Director of Education, April-July 1934

13.2

"E," 1934; includes correspondence with William E. Eberhardt (Buffalo City Council president) regarding possible exhibition of art by Anthony Sisti (local artist), Alvin C. Eastman (lecturer on Indian art), Richard Ederheimer regarding Gallery purchase of two trecento "Annunciation" panels, and Blache Rumsey Evans regarding possible exhibition of her artworks as well as information on December lecture by Ewald Eisenhardt.

13.3

Educational activities, 1934

13.4

"F," 1934

13.5

"G," 1934

13.6

"H," 1934; includes correspondence with Mark H. Haight (lecturer), Eugenie Hauenstein regarding gifts to Gallery library, N.M. Heeramaneck regarding Gallery purchase of Rajput paintings, and Charles Hopkinson (artist).

13.7

Rene d'Harnoncourt: lecture at Twentieth Century Club (Buffalo), February 1934

13.8

Housing Project, 1934; correspondence with various architects and housing authorities in Buffalo and New York concerning charted exhibition in celebration of the Federal Housing Administration Better Housing Program (Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority), October 1934.

13.9

"I," 1934

13.10

"J," 1934; includes material regarding the estate of Grace H. Jewett

13.11

"K," 1934; correspondents include artist Edward M. Knapp, M. Knoedler and Company, and Samuel H. Kress.

13.12

"L," 1934; includes correspondence with John Levy Galleries (New York) regarding the exchange of Gallery pieces for a Gainsborough landscape as well as correspondence with W. Colston Leigh concerning lecture bookings.

13.13

"M," 1934; includes material on dancer Vera Mirova, the Mothers Club of Buffalo, and Lewis Mumford's November lecture. Also includes correspondence with Pierre Matisee (New York) regarding the Matisse Gallery and purchase of Degas' La Coiffure.

13.14

"N," 1934; includes material from the National Recovery Administration and the National Alliance of Art and Industry.

14.1

New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1934

14.2

New York, Museum of Modern Art, 1934; correspondence with Alfred Barr and A. Conger Goodyear, concerns Gallery exhibition policy, etching by Otto Drix, and administrative changes at MOMA.

14.3

New York, Whitney Museum, 1934

14.4

"O," 1934; correspondents include local artist Kevin O'Callahan and Parisian art dealer Richard Owen.

14.5

"P," 1934; correspondents include Parrish-Watson (art dealers, New York), the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and the Persian Antique Gallery regarding the purchase of Persian miniatures.

14.6

A. Pancani (frame carver, New York), 1934; regarding frames for early Italian paintings.

14.7

Philadelphia Art Alliance, 1934; regarding loan of Epstein's Senegalese Woman.

14.8

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Museum of Art, 1934; loan correspondence regarding Cezanne's Pool at Jas de Bouffan.

14.9

Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institution Department of Fine Arts, 1934

14.10

Providence, Rhode Island School of Design, 1934

14.11

Pynson Printers, 1934; printing of Rockwell Kent bookplate.

14.12

"R," 1934; correspondents include Harry W. Rockwell of the State Teacher's College concerning the parking situation, Rudolf Meyer Riefstahl, and N.L. Silvester (curator of the Russell-Coates Art Gallery) regarding the demise of the Gallery Picture Lending Library.

14.13

Agnes Rindge: lecture, 1934

14.14

Rochester Memorial Art Gallery, 1934

14.15

Theodore Roosevelt: Spanish War Veterans Memorial Association, 1934; purchase of period furnishings, Wilcox home (Buffalo).

14.16

"S," 1934; includes correspondence with local artist Anthony Sisti and material concerning school tours.

14.17

St. Louis City Art Museum, 1934; includes reports and proposals for the establishment of an art conservation institute, Association of Art Museum Directors.

14.18

San Francisco, California Palace of the Legion of Honor (Walter Heil, director), 1934; includes correspondence regarding loans and the San Francisco Public Works of Art Project.

14.19

San Francisco Museum of Art, 1934; loan of Gallery Cezanne and Gauguin paintings

14.20

Bertha Searle: lecture on art at Garret Club (Buffalo), January 1934

14.21

Arnold Seligmann, Rey and Company, 1934; correspondence with Paul M. Byk.

14.22

Jacques Seligmann and Company, 1934; correspondence with Robert M. Levy.

14.23

Irwin Shapiro (DuWorld Pictures, film distributors): promotional material and correspondence, 1934

14.24

Lee Simonson, "Setting the Stage:" lecture at Gallery, October 1934

15.1

"T," 1934; correspondents include Marie Thibaudeau (Niagara Falls) and Trend (Buffalo weekly) editor Leston P. Faneuf.

15.2

Toronto Art Gallery: correspondence, 1934

15.3

Toledo Museum of Art, 1934; includes program for American Association of Museum Directors meeting May 1934.

15.4

"U," 1934; includes correspondence with the United States Department of Interior Office of Education regarding emergency education programs.

15.5

"V," 1934

15.6

Laura DeVinney (State Normal School, Fredonia), 1934; correspondence concerns lecture by Nora Christenson (education secretary) for the Dunkirk-Fredonia chapter of the American Association of University Women.

15.7

"W," 1934

15.8

Edward M. M. Warburg (American School of Ballet, Museum of Modern Art, New York), 1934

15.9

Washburn correspondence with staff members, 1934

15.10

Washington, DC, American Association of Museums, 1934

15.11

Washington, DC, American Federation of Arts, 1934

15.12

E. Weyhe Gallery (New York), 1934

15.13

Ruth Johnston Wright Memorial Fund, 1934

15.14

"Y," 1934

15.15

"Z," 1934

 

1935

16.1

"A," 1935; includes Frank Hartley Anderson (artist) regarding woodcut exhibition, American Artists' Group (New York), and Art News (New York) regarding editorial comments.

16.2

"B," 1935; includes Bernard Berenson (Italy) concerning the Gallery library and authentication of a drawing, Joseph Brummer (art dealer, New York), Brooklyn Museum (Philip Youtz, director), and George A. Brownell regarding loan of oil paintings to Gallery and gifts of books to Gallery library.

16.3

Boston, Museum of Fine Arts, 1935; correspondence with Robert T. Paine, Ananda Coomaraswamy, and G.H. Edgell (director) regarding the authentication of possible purchases.

16.4

Stephan Bourgeois, 1935; correspondence concerns the New York art market, events in Buffalo, Paris art dealers, the effect of the Depression on an art scholar's income potential, lectures, the Frick Gallery, art education theory and the Park School (Snyder), Joseph Duveen's election to the House of Lords, and other art critics and scholars. Also contains a manuscript by Bourgeois entitled " The Search for the Absolute."

16.5

Carl Bredemeier (Buffalo), 1935; correspondence concerns frames on Gallery collection.

16.6

W.S. Budworth and Son (New York), 1935; concerns shipping of art.

16.7

Buffalo Chamber of Commerce, 1935; correspondence concerns local observance of National Foreign Trade Week and various business concerns; also include information on Gallery educational activities and employment of Relief workers at the Gallery.

16.8

Buffalo Evening News, 1935; letter to the editor concerning local artists' groups protesting the first Western New York exhibition.

16.9

Buffalo Science Museum, 1935; correspondence with Chauncey Hamlin concerning lecturers, adult education cooperative programs, competition among architects for Kleinhans Music Hall contract, and inter-museum loans. Also includes copy of address given by Hamlin at the Annual Meeting of the Buffalo Public Library (January 1935) about cooperative education programs in Buffalo.

16.10

Buffalo Public School, 1935; regarding educator criticism of the establishment of a loan library at the Gallery using Carnegie Corporation funds. Also includes information on school tours.

16.11

Buffalo Society of Artists, 1935; use of Gallery for annual exhibitions.

16.12

University at Buffalo: lecture correspondence, 1935

16.13

"C," 1935; correspondents include Jean Capart (director, Musees Royaux et d'Histores, Brussels) and Emily P. Crangle regarding gift of a marine painting to President Roosevelt.

16.14

Cambridge, Fogg Art Museum, 1935; correspondence with Agnes Mongan and Paul J. Sachs

16.15

Chicago, Art Institute, 1935; correspondence regarding loan of drawing from the J.P. Morgan Library for the Master Drawings Exhibition.

16.16

Children's Painting Classes: information and statistics, 1935

16.17

Cleveland Museum of Art, 1935

16.18

College Art Association, 1935

16.19

P. and D. Colnaghi (art dealers, London), 1935; regarding bidding for works of art for the permanent collection at Christies Auction House.

16.20

Ananda Coomaraswamy: "Oriental and Occidental Aesthetics" lecture, March 1935 [See also 16.3]

16.21

C.T. Currelly (curator, Royal Ontario Museum): lecture, December 11, 1935

17.1

"D," 1935

17.2

A.S. Drey (New York), 1935

17.3

Dudunsing Galleries (New York), 1935

17.4

Durlacher Brothers (art dealers, New York), 1935

17.5

D'Youville College (Buffalo): correspondence, 1935

17.6

Detroit Institute of Arts: correspondence, 1935

17.7

"E," 1935; includes correspondence with lecturer Alvin C. Eastman.

17.8

Education activities: monthly statistical summaries, 1935

17.9

Ehrich Galleries (New York), 1935

17.10

"F," 1935

17.11

Ferargil (art dealers, New York), 1935

17.12

Georgie M.G. Forman (collector of oriental art, Buffalo), 1935; correspondence concerning gifts to Gallery.

17.13

French and Company (New York), 1935

17.14

Walter Friedlander: lecture, December 1935

17.15

"G," 1935

17.16

Ginn and Company (publishers), 1935; correspondence regarding the provenance of a statue of St. Gorgon.

17.17

Henrietta Grey (International School of Art, New York), 1935; concerning exhibitions of children's art, the Brooklyn Museum and the Brooklyn Children's Museum.

17.18

"H," 1935; correspondents include Harold Henderson regarding a loan of Chinese screen paintings and artist Charles Hopkins.

17.19

Eugenie Hauenstein: gift correspondence, 1935 [Hauenstein (a Buffalo artist) donated her scrapbooks on art in Buffalo (1887-1905) to the library]

17.20

N.M. Heeramaneck Galleries (New York), 1935; regarding purchase of a 17th century Indian painting, Shiva and Parvarti.

17.21

William M. Hekking (artist and former art director), 1935; correspondence with Judge Charles B. Sears about Tarbell's Portrait of J.J. Albright and local attitudes about the Gallery's failure to display it and other works in the permanent collection.

17.22

Simone Herman, 1935; correspondence concerns her visit to the Gallery with Fernand Leger.

17.23

"I," 1935

17.24

"J," 1935; correspondents include the Jewish Choral Society of Buffalo concerning use of the Gallery amphitheatre and Martin Janis (Buffalo collector) regarding loans of abstract and cubist artworks.

17.25

Edward Alden Jewell (art editor, New York Times): "Have we an American art?" lecture, March 18, 1935

17.26

Edouard Jonas (art dealer, Paris and New York), 1935; offers of impressionist and post-impressionist French art.

17.27

"K," 1935; includes correspondence with W. Rockhill Nelson Art Gallery (Kansas City) regarding MOMA film circulation, Mary Louise Keating (president, Niagara Falls Society of Artists), H. Kevorkian regarding offers of Persian and Indian art, Guenther Koch (German) regarding offer of works by Velasquez, Maulsby Kimball (Buffalo), M. Knoedler and Company (Charles Henschel) regarding offers of Ralph Earle portraits and Art Committee decision-making, and C.W. Kraushaar (New York) regarding Gallery purchase of artwork by Glackens.

17.28

"L," 1935; includes correspondence with C.T. Loo (oriental art dealer, New York).

17.29

William Lescaze: "Modern Architecture" lecture, November 1935

17.30

Library book acquisitions, 1934-1936; financial information on library purchases (Invoices and accounting forms discarded).

18.1

"M," 1935

18.2

Daniel T. Mallett: index of artists, 1935; includes list of prominent local artists.

18.3

Frank Jewett Mather: lecture at the Twentieth Century Club (Buffalo), 1935

18.4

Pierre Matisse (art dealer, New York), 1935

18.5

Colleen Moore (Chicago), 1935

18.6

Musical Events Calendar of Buffalo, 1934-1935

18.7

"N," 1935; includes Emily Newman (local artist and member of the Women's Advisory Council, Buffalo Fine Arts Academy), Niagara Frontier Planning Board, and New York Daily Worker.

18.8

Newark Museum of Art: correspondence, 1935

18.9

New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1935

18.10

New York, Museum of Modern Art, 1935; correspondence includes A. Conger Goodyear and MOMA staff members.

18.11

"O," 1935

18.12

"P," 1935

18.13

Edwin Panofsky: "The Role of Drawings in Art History" lecture, January 1935

18.14

Park School (Snyder, New York), 1935; correspondence concerning the reorganization of the school and progressive art education for children.

18.15

Picture Lending Library, 1935; contains brochure, transcript of radio talk, and lists of art available through the library.

18.16

Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute Department of Fine Arts, 1935

18.17

Progressive Education Association: correspondence, 1935

18.18

"Q," 1935; includes a letter from Cornelia Bentley Sage Quinton (former Gallery director).

18.19

"R," 1935; correspondents include FKM Rehn Gallery (New York), Louisa Robins (chairman, Women's Advisory Council, Buffalo Fine Arts Academy), Andrew Rithchie (London), Paul Rosenberg (art dealer, Paris), and Davis Rosen (art restorer, New York and Baltimore).

18.20

Recreation Institute of Buffalo, 1935; includes "Art and the Abundant Life," lecture given by Washburn, January 1935.

18.21

Rochester Memorial Art Gallery, 1935

18.22

Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Association (Buffalo), 1935; correspondence regarding the establishment of a memorial at the Wilcox home (Buffalo).

18.23

"S," 1935

19.1

San Francisco, M.H. de Young Memorial Museum: loan correspondence, 1935; information on Sargent's Venetian Bead Stringers and Gilbert Stuart's Manigault portraits.

19.2

Arnold Seligman, Rey and Co, 1935; correspondence with Paul M. Byk.

19.3

St. Louis City Art Museum, 1935

19.4

Marie Sterner Gallery (New York), 1935; correspondence with Marie Sterner and Jacques Furst.

19.5

"T," 1935; includes correspondence with Augustus Thibaudeau, concerning dispute between local artists' groups.

19.6

Toledo Museum of Art, 1935

19.7

Toronto Art Gallery, 1935; correspondence concerns exchange of local artists' exhibitions.

19.8

"U," 1935

19.9

Louis Untermeyer: "The New American Arts" lecture, November 1935; includes illustrated brochure.

19.10

"V," 1935; includes correspondence with Valentine Dudensing (art dealer, New York) regarding purchase considerations, and A. Conger Goodyear.

19.11

"W," 1935; correspondents include Gertrude Watson concerning gift of renaissance fireplace to the Gallery, E. Weyhe regarding purchases by board members, Theophyl Wendt (conductor, Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra) regarding concerts at Gallery, R.E.A. Wilson (art dealer, London) regarding drawing by Tiepolor sent to Gallery on approval, and Woodcut Society (Kansas City).

19.12

Washington, DC, American Association of Museums, 1935

19.13

Washington, DC, American Federation of Arts, 1935

19.14

Edwin J. Weiss (director of the Buffalo Fine Arts Academy), 1935; correspondence regarding private collection acquisitions, gifts of Menlo Alexander Memorial Fund, and William Hekking's After the Storm.

19.15

Wildenstein and Company (Paris and New York), 1935; correspondence with Felix Wildenstein, possible purchase of drawings by (Jean?) Fragonnard and other French artists.

19.16

Worchester Art Museum, 1935

19.17

"Y," 1935

19.18

"Z," 1935

 

1936

20.1

"A," 1936; includes American Artists' Congress, American Water Color Society (George P. Ennis), and American Artists' Professional League (National Art Week).

20.2

American Institute of Persian Art and Archaeology, 1936

20.3

Mortimer Adler (professor, University of Chicago): lecture, March 25, 1936

20.4

"B," 1936; correspondents include F.S. Beebe (Wichita, Kansas) regarding Amos W. Sangster, Bignou Gallery (New York) concerning purchase of an unidentified Cezanne and possible purchase of a painting by Utrillo for Knox private collection.

20.5

Baltimore Museum of Art, 1936

20.6

Boston Museum of Fine Arts, 1936

20.7

Stephan Bourgeois, 1936; correspondence concerns lectures, major museum purchases, the art market in general, and other art museums.

20.8

Brooklyn Museum, 1936

20.9

Joseph Brummer (gallery owner, New York), 1936

20.10

W.S. Budworth and Son: shipping of artworks, 1936

20.11

Buffalo City Planning Association, 1936; correspondence concerns a plan to purchase Henry Bush-Brown's monumental sculpture Indian Buffalo Hunt and Washburn's opposition to the plan.

20.12

Buffalo Council of Social Agencies: adult education planning correspondence, 1936

20.13

Buffalo Libraries, 1936

20.14

Buffalo Film Society, 1936; includes list of subscribers, financial information, press releases, and schedules. [Washburn, co-director]

20.15

Buffalo Museum of Science: correspondence, 1936

20.16

Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, founding of, 1936; information on concerts at the Elmwood Music Hall, brochures and promotional information.

20.17

University of Buffalo, 1936; includes correspondence with various faculty and Julian Park, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences; documents cooperation between the two institutions and lectures by staff at the University; includes Report of the Dean (1935-1936) and Report of the Gallery's Department of Allied Art and Industry (1933-1936), as well as a history of adult education efforts.

20.18

"C," 1936; includes correspondence with Alexander Calder (sculptor) regarding the offer of a mobile for purchase, the Charleston Museum (South Carolina) regarding Manigault family history, and the Courtauld Institute (London).

20.19

Cambridge, Fogg Art Museum, 1936; correspondence with Agnes Mongan and Paul Sachs concerning authentication of possible purchases.

20.20

Herbert Cescinsky: lecture, November 1936

20.21

Chicago, Art Institute, 1936; correspondence with Daniel C. Rich (curator) regarding drawings by F. Leger and circulating exhibitions offered.

20.22

Cincinnati Art Museum, 1936; correspondence concerning F. Duveneck's Portrait of a Young Man.

20.23

Cleveland Museum of Art, 1936; loans to Great Lakes Exposition.

20.24

College Art Association (New York), 1936

20.25

P. and D. Colnaghi (London), 1936; correspondence concerning Gallery purchases of old master drawing at auction in London.

21.1

"D," 1936; includes correspondence with Mrs. H.G. Dearth concerning her husband's paintings exhibited at the Gallery from 1906 to 1924 and "Design Laboratory" Federal Art Project (New York).

21.2

Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, 1936

21.3

Robert T. Davis, Director of Education, 1936; includes Davis's correspondence with other museums concerning educational activities.

21.4

Detroit Institute of Fine Arts, 1936

21.5

Director's Book Club, September 1936-1938; includes correspondence with members of the board. Book club subscriptions to benefit the library.

21.6

Director's Book Club: books purchased, 1936

21.7

"E," 1936; correspondents include Alvin C. Eastman (New York Public Library), Ehrich-Newhouse Galleries (New York), and H.A. Elsbey regarding the purchase of antique textiles. Also includes information about the Erie County Fair.

21.8

Educational activities, 1936; monthly statistical analysis based on attendance records.

21.9

"F," 1936

21.10

"G," 1936; includes correspondence with Erwin S. Barrie (Grand Central Art Galleries) concerning loan of Charles Burchfield painting to the 20th Venice Biennial exhibition.

21.11

"Goya," 1936; research for proposed exhibition, correspondence.

21.12

"H," 1936

21.13

Jiro Hirada: lecture on Japanese art, October 7, 1936

21.14

Jacob Hirsch: purchase consideration of Roman artworks, 1936

21.15

"I," 1936

21.16

"J," 1936

21.17

"K," 1936; includes correspondence with Spencer Kellogg, Jr.

21.18

M. Knoedler and Company (New York), 1936; includes correspondence with Louis Carre regarding purchase of Benin Bronze Head and other matters.

21.19

"L," 1936; correspondents include Mrs. Gaston Lachaise, William Lescaze (architect and lecturer), John Levy Galleries regarding the disposition of L'Hermitte's Haymakers, Daniel B. Leavy (University at Buffalo professor) concerning lectures at Gallery, Lawrence Lebduska (artist), and Eustache deLorey (lecturer on Islamic art).

21.20

C.T. Loo (New York and Paris), 1936

22.1

"M," 1936; includes Pierre Matisse (art dealer, New York), MacDowell Club (New York) regarding loan of Jonas Lie's "Old Logging Road" (also includes correspondence with the artist), Elizabeth Mongan.

22.2

Thomas Munro: lecture, March 1936

22.3

Museum advertising, 1936; correspondence with other art museum directors.

22.4

"N," 1936; includes Emily Newman (Patteran Society of Artists, Buffalo), National Academy of Design (Jonas Lie, president), National Association of Art Education, and Niagara Falls Society of Artists (Mary Louise Keating).

22.5

Newark Museum, 1936

22.6

New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1936; include information on the roundtable conference of museum registrars.

22.7

New York, Museum of Modern Art, 1936; includes correspondence with director Alfred Barr concerning purchases by Buffalo citizens and a Van Gogh exhibition, with T.D. Mabry concerning circulating exhibits of abstract art, and with A.C. Goodyear concerning the Van Gogh exhibition and the Kroeller-Mueller Foundation collection of Van Gogh works. Also includes information on a poster competition sponsored by MOMA with a list of local entrants, customs laws and the importing of abstract art, and Gallery loans to MOMA photography exhibitions and the Photo-Secession at the Albright, 1909-1910.

22.8

"O," 1936

22.9

"P," 1936; includes the Patteran Society (Buffalo), and the Polish Art Service as well as correspondence with W.H. Potterfield regarding his declining health and negatives of the Gallery.

22.10

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Museum of Art, 1936; notice of mural competition, Federal Art Project, Binghampton, New York.

22.11

"Picture of the Month," 1936; monthly loans of masterpieces to the Gallery for special exhibition from New York art galleries and American museums in the northeast. Includes photograph of Modigliani's Grand nu Couche on loan from Jacques Seligmann and Company. Mentions reaction of the Buffalo public to the exhibition of nude paintings (November-December 1936).

22.12

Progressive Education Association, Western New York Regional Conference, 1936; includes information on Washburn's involvement, lectures, correspondence, programs, and agendas.

22.13

"R," 1936; includes Rudolf Meyer Riefstahl (lecturer), Rochester Print Club (lecture by Washburn), David Rosen - April 1936 lecture, Theodore Roosevelt National Memorial Association (Buffalo), and Gordon W. Ross regarding children's story hours at the Gallery. Also includes correspondence with Baroness Rebay(?) (New York) regarding F. Leger, Guggenheim collection, and Rudolf Bauer.

22.14

Rochester Memorial Art Gallery, 1936

22.15

Radio Talks, 1935-1937; weekly radio talks on WKBW by Gallery staff and volunteers. Contains transcripts of all talks. Subjects include: educational activities and docentry, shipping and hanging of exhibitions, museum work, and children's activities.

22.16

"S," 1936

23.1

St. Louis, City Art Museum, 1936

23.1A

Salary Survey of Museums, 1936

23.2

San Diego, Fine Arts Gallery, 1936

23.3

San Francisco, Museum of Art, 1936

23.4

Gilbert Seldes: lecture, January 15, 1936

23.5

Arnold Seligmann, Rey and Co. (New York), 1936

23.6

Jacques Seligmann (New York): loan correspondence, 1936

23.7

John Sewell (University of Buffalo professor of art, lecturer at Gallery), 1936; University and Gallery cooperation.

23.8

Herbert J. Spinden: lecture, February 1936

23.9

Marie Sterner (art dealer, New York), 1936

23.10

"T," 1936

23.11

Toledo Museum of Art; 1936 meeting of the American Association of Museum Directors program and director's report concerning the charging of rental fees for works loaned out to circulating exhibitions. Also includes proposal by Society of American Painters, Sculptors and Gravers and loan correspondence (Gauguin's Promenade au Bord de la Mer).

23.12

Toronto, Art Gallery of Toronto, 1936; includes correspondence giving Albright Art Gallery attendance figures for 1935.

23.13

"U," 1936

23.14

"V," 1936

23.15

"W," 1936; includes correspondence with Richard F. Winans, Federal Writers' Project.

23.16

Washington, DC, American Association of Museums, 1936

23.17

Washington, DC, American Federation of Arts, 1936

23.18

Edwin J. Weiss, 1936; correspondence concerning purchases for his private collection.

23.19

Reverend P.E.T. Widdrington (disarmament lecturer): visit to Buffalo, Fall 1936

23.20

Wildenstein and Co, 1936; correspondence with Felix Wildenstein concerning possible exchange of Cezanne's Pool at Jas de Bouffan.

23.21

Richard S. Winans: correspondence, 1936 [See also folder 23.15]

23.22

Worcester Art Museum, 1936

23.23

"Y," 1936

23.24

Yamanaka and Company (New York): oriental art, 1936

23.25

"Z," 1936

 

1937

24.1

"A," 1937; includes Bank of America (Hollywood, California) regarding the estate of Cornelia Bentley Sage Quinton, "An American Group" (artists society, Frederick Knight, president), Art Collectors and Artists Association (Buffalo), Arden Gallery (New York) regarding works by W.H. Gatwick, Jr. (local artist), and Art Institute of Light (New York) "Wildred and his New Clavilux" brochure.

24.2

American Institute of Iranian Art and Archaeology, 1937

24.3

Art Tariff, 1937; correspondence with Representative Jason M. Mead, Chairman of the Committee on Post Office and Post Roads, concerning H.R. 6738, proposed tariff on importation of antiques and works of art.

24.4

"B," 1937; includes Harold Bauer (lecturer, Long Island), Christian Brinton (lecturer), Buffalo Broadcasting Corporation regarding Gallery radio talks, Buffalo Times Model Home Contest.

24.5

Bachstitz Gallery (New York), 1937

24.6

Baltimore Museum of Art, 1937

24.7

George Grey Barnard (collector of medieval art), 1937

24.8

Iris Barry (curator of film library, MOMA): "On Liking the Wrong Films" lecture, March 1937

24.9

Behrendt Piano Recital: benefit performance, November 10, 1937

24.10

Bignou Gallery (New York), 1937

24.11

Stephan Bourgeois, 1937; correspondence concerns activities in the New York art world, Gallery purchases, purchases by Buffalo collectors, oriental art, and the Master Bronzes Exhibition review; mentions dealer Louis Carre and Mabel Dodge Luhan (former Buffalonian).

24.12

Brooklyn Museum, 1937

24.13

Joseph Brummer Gallery (New York), 1937

24.14

Bucholz Gallery (New York), 1937

24.15

Budworth and Son (New York): shipping of art, 1937

24.16

Buffalo Film Society, 1937; film series information.

24.17

Buffalo Museum of Science, 1937

24.18

Buffalo Print Club (Kevin B. O'Callahan, president), 1937

24.19

Buffalo Historical Society (Robert Bingham, president), 1937

24.20

Buffalo Society of Artists, 1937; use of basement level gallery, schedule of exhibitions. Also correspondence concerning the conversion of the Print Room for use as a local artists gallery.

24.21

University of Buffalo, 1937; correspondence documents cooperation between Gallery and University. Includes a letter from Julian Park (Dean, College of Arts and Sciences) concern John Sewell (Chair, University Department of Art).

24.22

"C," 1937; includes correspondence with W.O. Chapin regarding inventory and valuation of art in private collection and Stanley G. Cornish regarding Gallery educational activities for adults.

24.23

Cambridge, Fogg Art Museum, 1937; contains routine correspondence regarding the loan of Benin bronze head to the Fogg Art Museum. Also contains extensive correspondence with Paul J. Sachs and Anges Mongan concerning Gallery purchase considerations, travel in Europe, lectures, the Master Bronzes exhibition, notes on slides of the Gallery building sent to Sachs, the history and mission of the Gallery, and a description of the library, sculpture court, docentry, and educational activities.

24.24

Carnegie Corporation of New York: project correspondence, 1937; Education Department program for secondary school students, funding for purchase of supplies, includes notes and data of R.T. Davis, Director of Education.

24.25

Louis Carre (New York and Paris): correspondence, 1937; concerns a Toulouse-Lautrec exhibition (see also 24.11).

24.26

Chicago, Art Institute, 1937; correspondence concerning the Chicago Leger exhibition (February 1937) and possible purchase of statue of a bodhisattva from Yamanaka and Company.

24.27

Cincinnati Art Museum, 1937

24.28

Cleveland Museum of Art, 1937; loans to the Sculpture in Our Time exhibition (Brancusi, Mestrovic) and of Hassam and Twachtman paintings to the Great Lakes Exposition (1936-1937).

24.29

College Art Association (New York), 1937

25.1

"D," 1937; correspondence includes Mrs. H.G. Dearth regarding her husband's paintings owned in Buffalo, Dance International art exhibition (New York), and Rene d'Harnoncourt concerning American Indians.

25.2

Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, 1937; correspondence concerns Dallas Museum's purchase of Monet's Seine at Lavacour from exhibition at Gallery.

25.3

Detroit Institute of Fine Arts: loan correspondence, 1937; includes information on loan of Ceanne's Aix en Provence. [See also 25.6]

25.4

Directors' Book Club: 1937-1938 season, 1937 [invoices for books purchased have been discarded]

25.5

Jean Pierre Duosc (dealer and collector of Chinese art, Paris), 1937; correspondence concerns travel to the United States.

25.6

Durand-Ruel, Inc. (New York), 1937; Dallas Museum purchase of Monet's La Seine a Lavacour on loan to Gallery. [See also 25.3]

25.7

"E," 1937; includes John Ede (British lecturer, Institute of International Education, March 1937), Alvin C. Eastman, and Erie (Pennsylvania) Art Club (Hazel Brayner, secretary).

25.8

Educational activities, 1937; monthly statistical summaries based on attendance.

25.9

Elmira College (Elmira, New York), 1937; correspondence with President Pott concerning art lectures by University of Buffalo professor John Sewell.

25.10

"F," 1937; includes Georgia M.G. Foran (Buffalo collector) and Society of Fuir Arts (Palm Beach, Florida) concerning loan of Gauguin.

25.11

F.A.R. Galleries (New York), 1937; purchase of posters by Toulouse-Lautrec.

25.12

French At Gallery (New York), 1937

25.13

"G," 1937; includes correspondence with I.S. Gardner Museum (Boston) regarding Gallery "flower court" plan for sculpture hall, Charles W. Goodyear, Bertram Glover (local artist), Delius Gliese, Rene Gimpel, Belle Green (director, Morgan Library, New York), Adolph Goldschmidt (New York) regarding Gallery purchase of fifteenth century head of Christ, Guild of Allied Arts (Buffalo), and Fanny P. Goddard (the Lenox, Buffalo) regarding lectures and Buffalo art societies.

25.14

"H," 1937; includes correspondence with James G. Hanes (hosiery manufacturer) regarding the Master Bronzes exhibition, Helen Louise Hatch regarding her urn containing relic of St. George, and Heeramaneck Galleries (New York) regarding purchase of a bronze Bala Krishna figure, and a list of works in the T. Edward Hamnley Collection.

25.15

Christine Haller (Gallery librarian): correspondence, 1937

25.16

David A. Howe Public Library (Wellsville), 1937; loan correspondence.

25.17

Hudson Forwarding and Shipping Company, 1937; international shipping of art objects.

25.18

"I, 1937; includes correspondence with the Institute of International Education concerning lecturere H.S. Ede (curator of the Tate Gallery, London).

25.19

"J," 1937

25.20

"K," 1937; includes correspondence with Kittinger Company (Buffalo), Grace Koen (local artist) and Katherine Kuh (Chicago).

25.21

F. Kleinberger and Co. (New York), December 1937; possible purchase of The Healing of Old Tobias by his Son, a Rembrandt drawing.

25.22

M. Knoedler and Co. (New York), 1937; includes correspondence about the loan of La Toilette by Picasso to Paris Contemporary Art exhibition and with Fitzroy Carrington concerning the Chapin Print collection.

25.23

Antoinette Kraushaar, C.W. Kraushaar and Co. (New York), 1937; acquisition of Everett Shinn's Theatre Box and purchased by a Buffalo collector.

26.1

"L," 1937; includes correspondence with Florence Lee regarding gifts to the Gallery library, Olive M. Lyford (Federal Art Project No. 1) regarding Gallery film program, A.P. Little Co. (Rochester).

26.2

Lecture suggestions, 1937

26.3

Karl Lehman-Hartleben: lecture, January 1937

26.4

Library Purchases, 1937

26.5

Living American Art, Inc. (New York), 1937; arrangements for an exhibit of reproductions.

26.6

C.T. Loo and Co. (New York and Paris), 1937; Chinese and oriental art.

26.7

"M," 1937; includes correspondence with Paul Mallon (art dealer, Egypt) regarding purchase of a "Byzantine" plate, Pierre Matisse (art dealer, New York), Daniel Mallet concerning index of Buffalo artists, and Morgan Library (New York, Belle Green, director) regarding the opening of Master Bronzes.

26.8

Rolf de Mare: lecture, December 1937

26.9

"N," 1937; includes correspondence with New Art Center (J.B. Neumann, director).

26.10

New York, Metropolitan Museum, 1937

26.11

New York, Museum of Modern Art, 1937; includes correspondence with Monroe Wheeler (chair, Research Committee on Industrial Art), A. Conger Goodyear, and Beaumont Newhall regarding loan of Gallery photographs to MOMA photography exhibition.

26.12

"O," 1937; includes correspondence with Kevin B. O'Callahan (local artist) and the Oriental Institute (Chicago) regarding the provenance of a Gallery-owned Sumerian jade statuette.

26.13

"P," 1937; includes Walter Pach lecture at Gallery and correspondence with Charles C. Page regarding the estate of Willis O. Chapin, P. Picasso regarding La Toilette, the Patteran Society (Buffalo), the Plimpton family, and W.H. Poterfield regarding Gallery negatives.

26.14

Picture of the Month, 1937; correspondence with New York galleries regarding monthly loans for exhibitions.

26.15

Ivan Podgorsky (art dealer): correspondence, 1937

26.16

Print Club of Buffalo, September 1937

26.17

Publicity, September-December 1937

26.18

LaVerne J. Quackenbush (local artist), April 1937

26.19

"R," 1937; includes correspondence with G. Roeder (director of the Pelizaeus Museum, Denmark) and about excavations in Egypt and Gallery purchase of an Egyptian figure.

26.20

Rochester Memorial Art Gallery, 1937

27.1

"S," 1937; includes correspondence with Joseph Schrader (Buffalo) regarding mental telepathic transmission of images to the blind and Anthony Sisti (local artist).

27.2

Charles and Laura Safford: opera recitals, April 1937

27.3

San Francisco: California Palace of the Legion of Honor, 1937

27.4

San Francisco Museum of Art: loan correspondence, 1937

27.5

St. Louis City Art Museum, 1937; correspondence with president Leon La Beaume concerning museum loan policies and ethics.

27.6

Isabelle R. Scott, 1937; lecture by Carlton Palmer, correspondence.

27.7

Jacques Seligmann (New York and Paris), 1937; loan of Modigliani's Grand Nu Couche.

27.8

Arnold Seligmann, Rey and Co.: correspondence with Paul M. Byk, 1937; regarding purchase of Claude Lorrain's Philip Baptizing the Eunuch and Head of Madonna, a 15th century German wood sculpture.

27.9

John I. Sewell (art professor, University of Buffalo), 1937

27.10

Meyer Shapiro: lecture, November 1937

27.11

Syracuse Museum of Fine Arts, 1937

27.12

"T," 1937

27.13

Carol M. Terry (Gallery librarian), August 1937

27.14

Toledo Museum of Art, 1937; contains correspondence with director Black More Godwin and American Association of Museum Directors convention information.

27.15

Toronto Art Gallery, 1937

27.16

"U," 1937

27.17

"V," 1937

27.18

"W," 1937; includes correspondence with Edwin J. Weiss (Buffalo collector) and Charles R. Wilson regarding resume of service on the board of directors of the Buffalo Fine Arts Association.

27.19

Maynard Walker Gallery (New York), 1937

27.20

Edward M.M. Warburg (New York), 1937 [See also 2:1]

27.21

Langdon Warner: lecture, January 1937

27.22

Washington, DC, American Association of Museums, 1937

27.23

Washington, DC, American Federation of Arts: annual convention, May 1937

27.24

E. Weyhe (New York), 1937

27.25

Wildenstien and Co. (New York and Paris), 1937

27.26

Worcester Art Museum, 1937

27.27

"Y," 1937

27.28

Yamanaka and Company (New York), 1937

27.29

"Z," 1937

 

1938

28.1

"A," 1938; correspondence includes Robert Almy regarding "Art Experiment" at Park School (Snyder) and the American Association of University Women (Buffalo) regarding lectures by Gallery staff.

28.2

American Art Association, Anderson Galleries (New York), 1938

28.3

Andover, Addison Gallery of American Art, 1938

28.4

Art Digest (New York): publicity for Great Lakes Exhibition, 1938

28.5

Art Extension Press: correspondence, 1926-1938; reproductions of works in the collection.

28.6

Art News : correspondence, 1938

28.7

Auburn (New York), Cayuga Museum: Matisse exhibition customs correspondence, 1938

28.8

"B," 1938; includes correspondence with Colonel Joseph T. Becker regarding indefinite loans to the Buffalo Armory, George K. Birge regarding "March Message," and Carl Bredemeier (Buffalo).

28.9

Baltimore Municipal Museum, 1938; correspondence about Washburn's January 1938 lecture.

28.10

Baltimore Museum of Art, 1938

28.11

Baltimore, Walters Art Gallery: correspondence with David Rosen (art restorer), 1938

29.1

"C," 1938

29.2

Cambridge, Fogg Art Museum, 1938; correspondence with Edna Mongan and Paul Sachs concerning the R.C.A. Room of Contemporary Art and other Gallery events, Washburn's honorary degree; also includes correspondence with Museum staff authenticating possible purchases.

29.3

Carnegie Corporation Grant: Secondary School Project, 1938

29.4

Carnegie Corporation: University of Buffalo cooperation, 1938

29.5

Louis Carre (art dealer, Paris), 1938; correspondence concerning the provenance of Lehmbruck's Kneeling Woman and an exhibition of works by Juan Gris.

29.6

Chicago, Art Institute, 1938

29.7

Cleveland Museum of Art, 1938

29.8

College Art Association, 1938; list of lectures offered by Robert T. Davis, Director of Education.

29.9

Contemporary Arts Gallery (New York), 1938

29.10

"D," 1938; includes Edwin Dickinson (artist, Paris).

29.11

Department Store Project, 1938; outline of courses given to local department store workers in art appreciation (Margaret George, instructor) [Gallery Department of Allied Arts and Industry].

29.12

Detroit Institute of Arts, 1938

29.13

Director's Book Club, 1938; purchases of books for Gallery library.

29.14

Downtown Gallery (New York), 1938; correspondence with Edith Halpert.

29.15

Jean Pierre Dubosc: visit to Buffalo, January 1938

29.16

Durand-Ruel, Inc., 1938

29.17

Duveen Brothers (New York), 1938

29.18

Durlacher Brothers (New York), 1938; provenance of Claude Lorrain's Philip Baptizing the Eunuch.

29.19

"E," 1938; Alice Henderson Evans (Sante Fe) and Erie County Fair Fine Art Exhibit (September).

29.20

Educational activities, 1938; monthly statistical summaries based on attendance.

29.21

Esto Publishing, Co. (California): correspondence, 1938; includes Gallery sales desk information, sales of museum pamphlets.

29.22

Exhibition suggestions, 1938; schedules, correspondence with museums and other organizations.

29.23

"F," 1938

29.24

French Art Galleries, 1938

29.25

Georgia M.G. Forman (Buffalo collector), 1938; correspondence concerning purchases of oriental art.

29.26

"G," 1938

29.27

General Education Board (New York), 1938; Robert T. Davis (Director of Education) conference notes on art museum educational theory.

29.28

Goodman-Walker, Inc. (art dealers, Boston), 1938

29.29

W.E. Guilbault, 1938; correspondence concerning relics of St. Gorgon.

30.1

"H," 1938; includes correspondence with William Randolph Hearst (California) regarding the disposition of his collection, William M. Hekking (Los Angeles), Harold Henderson regarding screens in the A. Michael Collection, and Charles Hopkinson (artist).

30.2

T. Edward Hanley (expert, dealer, collector): correspondence, 1938

30.3

Marie Harriman Gallery (New York), 1938

30.4

Heeramaneck Galleries (New York), 1938; purchase of Nepalese 14th Century leaves with miniatures, Manuscript of the Prajnaparamita.

30.5

"I," 1938; includes Art Institute of Light (New York)

30.6

Insurance: Gurney, Becker, and Overturf (Buffalo), 1938; insurance on permanent collection, liability, workmen's compensation.

30.7

"J," 1938

30.8

Arthur Jagee (New York), 1938; postcards for the sales desk.

30.9

"K," 1938; includes correspondence with Spencer Kellogg, Jr. regarding gifts to the Gallery library.

30.10

M. Knoedler and Company (New York), 1938

30.11

"L," 1938

30.12

Henry A. Lapin (lecturer), March 2, 1938

30.13

Los Angeles Museum of History, Science and Art: correspondence, 1938

30.14

Rudolf Lesch (New York): Sales Desk reproductions correspondence, 1938

30.15

Library purchases, 1938

30.16

C.T. Loo (New York), 1938; correspondence concerning possible purchase of oriental art.

30.17

"M," 1938; includes correspondence with Austin Mitchell and Montclair Art Museum (New Jersey) regarding the loan of Gallery Bellows painting.

30.18

Paul Mallon (French, New York), 1938

30.19

Pierre Matisse (New York): loan correspondence, 1938

30.20

Daniel G. Mason: lecture, February 1938

30.21

Roy Mitchell: lecture, January 1938

30.22

"N," 1938

30.23

New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1938

30.24

New York, Museum of Modern Art (A. Conger Goodyear, president), 1938; correspondence concerning the New York World's Fair, Gallery loans to the MOMA Paris and photography exhibitions.

30.25

New York, Museum of Modern Art: "Four Architectural Exhibitions," 1938; correspondence and checklists.

30.26

New York National Guard (Buffalo Armory): loan correspondence, 1938

30.27

New York, Whitney Museum of American Art (Juliana Force, director): loan correspondence, 1938

31.1

"O," 1938

31.2

"P," 1938; includes correspondence with Walter Pach (art scholar), Georgette Passedoit (modern art dealer, New York), Photographic Guild of Buffalo, Ralph M. Pearson (Design Workshop, New York), and Stanley Podd regarding the choice of sculpture for Kleinhans' Music Hall (Buffalo) [Federal Art Project correspondence].

31.3

Philadelphia, Museum of Art, 1938

31.4

Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania University Museum, 1938

31.5

"Photographs of the Permanent Collection" contest for local photographers, April-July 1938

31.6

Picture of the Month, 1938; monthly exhibitions of art loaned to the Gallery from other museums and commercial galleries.

31.7

Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute Department of Fine Arts, 1938

31.8

Press Releases and Publicity, 1938

31.9

"R," 1938; includes correspondence with Riverside Museum (New York) regarding circuit of Patteran Society exhibition, Rochester Print Club regarding Gallery loans, and Ludwig Mies der Rohe regarding visit to Buffalo.

31.10

Radio speeches by Gallery staff, October 1937-May 1939; includes schedules and test of speeches discussing Gallery activities and exhibits and talks on art history.

31.11

Hermann von Ranke (German expert on Middle-eastern art and archaeology): lecture, November 18, 1938

31.12

David Rosen (New York), 1938; art restoration and authentication of works in the permanent collection.

31.13

"S," 1938

32.1

San Francisco Museum of Art (Claudia Davis, curator), January 1938

32.2

G. Schmidt-Pizzaro (London), 1938; correspondence concerning pre-Incan textiles at the Gallery.

32.3

Arnold Seligmann, Rey and Co: correspondence with Paul M. Byk, 1938

32.4

Jacques Seligmann and Co: correspondence with Robert Levy, 1938

32.5

John I. Sewell (art history professor, University of Buffalo): correspondence, 1938; concerning lectures in and around Buffalo.

32.6

Maurice J. Speiser (Philadelphia), June 1938; correspondence concerns legislative bills establishing a Federal commission to regulate art activities in the United States.

32.7

Springfield, Massachusetts, Museum of Fine Arts: correspondence, Fall 1938

32.8

State Teachers' College at Buffalo, 1938; correspondence documenting the use of Gallery grounds.

32.9

G.E. Stechert and Co (New York), 1938; library acquisitions.

32.10

R. Stora (art dealers, New York), 1938

32.11

Bruno Streiff (Zurich), May 1938

32.12

Mary Sullivan (art dealer, New York), 1938; correspondence concerning various French Impressionist works.

32.13

"T," 1938; includes correspondence with Augustus Thibaudeau (photographer, Niagara Falls) and a letter to Time magazine written by S.H. Knox regarding the establishment of the Room of Contemporary Art.

32.14

Henri Rhannhauser (author, Paris), 1938; gifts to Gallery library and possible purchase of art by Degas and Gauguin.

32.15

Toledo Museum of Art and Association of Art Museum Directors, 1938; includes minutes of 1938 convention in Philadelphia and correspondence regarding loans to the Cleveland Modernist exhibition.

32.16

Toronto Art Gallery, 1938; correspondence concerns Works Progress Administration clerical projects at Gallery.

32.17

Toronto, Royal Ontario Museum, 1938

32.18

Paul Trebilcock (artist, New York), 1938; loan of Gallery's Old London Coachman.

32.19

"U," 1938; includes correspondence with US Camera.

32.20

"V," 1938; includes correspondence with Martha Visser't Hooft (local artist).

32.21

Valentine Gallery (New York), 1938; correspondence with Valentine Duduensing concerning various works available for purchase.

32.22

"W," 1938; includes correspondence with C. Edward Wells (dealer, New York) and a membership directory of the Western New York Federation of Women's Clubs.

32.23

Washburn's correspondence with Gallery staff members, 1938

32.24

Washington, DC, American Association of Museums, 1938

32.25

Washington, DC, American Federation of Arts, 1938; exhibition and acquisition publicity correspondence.

32.26

Washington, DC: Dumbarton Oaks Collection, 1938

32.27

Edwin J. Weiss: correspondence, 1938; includes answers to questionnaire on Buffalo art activities.

32.28

E. Weyhe, 1938; library book purchases through Carnegie Corporation grant monies.

32.29

Wildenstein and Co. (New York), 1938

32.30

Worcester Art Museum, 1938

32.31

"Y," 1938; includes YMCA of Buffalo Christmas card featuring Gallery artworks.

32.32

Yamanak and Co. (oriental art dealers, New York), 1938; correspondence with K. Tanaka concerning purchases by a Buffalo collector.

32.33

Howard Young Galleries (New York), 1938

32.34

"Z," 1938

 

1939

33.1

"A," 1939; includes correspondence with Alexander Archipenko (sculptor) regarding the possibility of representation in the Room of Contemporary Art, Herbert Appleton (Buffalo commercial photographer), Marian Anderson Mural Fund Committee (Treasury Department Section of Fine Arts, Edward Bruce, chairman), "Anonymous Masked Heckler" (disgruntled Buffalo art expert?), American Academy of Arts and Letters regarding the provenance of Hassam's Church at Old Lyme, and American Artists' Congress for Peace regarding the circulation of Picasso's Guernica exhibition.

33.2

Activities, 1939; contains printed material and press releases about Gallery activities and includes descriptions of the Education Department resource center and docent services at the Gallery and histories of the Secondary School Project and the Room of Contemporary Art. Also includes visit schedules.

33.3

Andover, Massachusetts, Addison Gallery of American Art, 1939

33.4

Dorothy Adlow: "The Artist in the Modern World" lecture, February 8, 1939

33.5

"B," 1939; includes correspondence with Florence Julia Bach (local artist), Solomon S. Bauch (artist), Frank W. Benson (artist) for the estate of E.C. Tarbell, British Broadcasting Company (London) regarding publication of Gallery acquisitions, and Earl Burton regarding the provenance of Montlicelli Portrait of Mde. Rosenthal. Also includes copy of Charles Burchfield letter to S.H. Knox giving reasons for his resignation from the Room of Contemporary Art administration committee.

33.6

Baltimore, Walters Art Gallery, 1939; correspondence with David Rosen (conservator and art scholar) regarding works in the permanent collection.

33.7

Elsa Bement: correspondence, September-October 1939

33.8

Binghampton Museum of Fine Arts: lecture correspondence, 1939

33.9

Bignou Gallery (New York), 1939

33.10

Black Mountain College (North Carolina): Josef Albers, May 1939; contains an annotated catalogue and letter concerning an exhibition of his work, Artists Gallery (December 1938).

33.11

Mrs. Emmanuel Boasberg (Buffalo), 1939

33.12

Boston, Institute of Modern Art, 1939; correspondence with James Plaut (director) regarding proposed Roualt exhibitions and other circulating exhibitions. Mentions Washburn's itinerary in Europe buying art for the RCA Room of Contemporary Art? Art (Spring 1939).

33.13

Boston Museum of Fine Art, 1939

33.14

Stephan Bourgeois (representative for the RCA Room of Contemporary Art, New York), 1939; correspondence discusses Room of Contemporary Art purchases. Also contains a manuscript in short story form, explaining the need for the establishment of the Room of Contemporary Art.

33.15

Stephan Bourgeois: lecture, November 1939

33.16

Brooklyn Museum, 1939; includes correspondence with Carl O. Schniewind (curator of prints and drawings) concerning lecture at Gallery.

33.17

Brummer Gallery, Inc., 1939

33.18

Buscholz Gallery, 1939; loans to R.C.A. Room of Contemporary Art exhibitions.

33.19

W.S. Budworth and Son, 1939; shipping of art.

33.20

City of Buffalo and Buffalo institutions: correspondence, 1939

33.21

Buffalo Historical Society, 1939

33.22

Buffalo Museum of Natural Science, 1939

33.23

Buffalo Society of Artists: correspondence, 1939; includes a copy of B.S.A. bylaws and constitution for the year 1932, correspondence with W.J. Schwanekamp (president) and Victor Aures (treasurer).

33.24

University of Buffalo, 1939; correspondence with Thomas B. Lockwood and Samuel S. Capen.

34.1

"C," 1939

34.2

Cambridge, Fogg Art Museum: general correspondence, 1939

34.3

Cambridge, Fogg Art Museum: Agnes Mongan correspondence, 1939

34.4

Cambridge, Fogg Art Museum: Professor Paul J. Sachs correspondence, 1939

34.5

Louis Carre (art dealer, Paris and New York), 1939 [See also Box 33, Folder 14, correspondence of Stephen Bourgeois]

34.6

Chicago, Art Institute: correspondence with Daniel C. Rich (director), 1939

34.7

Chinese Sui Dynasty correspondence, January 1938-April 1939; includes purchase consideration, correspondence with Edgar Worch (art dealer, Berlin), Gertrude Trubner, Adolf Kohl, and Alfred Salmony.

34.8

Cincinnati Art Museum, 1939; correspondence concerning proposed Patteran Exhibition at the C.A.M.

34.9

Cleveland Museum of Art, 1939; contains an outline of A.A.G. Secondary School Project plan.

34.10

College Art Association, 1939

34.11

Consumer classes, 1937-1939; adult education program.

34.12

"D," 1939

34.13

Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, October 1939; correspondence details Gallery educational activities.

34.14

Davies, Turner and Co.: international shipping of art for the Room of Contemporary Art, 1939; works purchased by Washburn and S.H. Knox, Europe, Spring 1939.

34.15

Detroit Institute of Arts and Arts Quarterly magazine, 1939

34.16

Downtown Gallery, New York City, 1939; purchase of Yasuo Kuniyoshi's I Think So, correspondence with Edith Halpert.

34.17

Anna Glenny Dunbar, 1939; private collection loans to A.A.G.

34.18

Durlacher Bros. (New York), 1939; purchase considerations.

34.19

Albert Duveen (art dealer, New York), 1939

34.20

"E," 1939

34.21

H.S. Ede (Tangiers, North Africa, former curator of Tate Gallery, lecturer, biographer of Henri Gaudier-Brzeska), 1939

34.22

"F," 1939

34.23

Georgia M.G. Foreman (Buffalo collector), 1939

34.24

Peter J. Flores (classical art dealer): correspondence, November 1938-March 1939; art research by Stephen Bourgeois.

34.25

French Art Gallery (New York), 1939

34.26

"G," 1939; correspondents include Sid Gotcliffe (artist, New York City), Charles L. Gurney (president, Buffalo Savings Bank) regarding authorization of painting in private collection, and William H. Gratwick.

35.1

Naum Gabo (artist, London); regarding possible constructivist exhibition, May 1939.

35.2

General Education Board (New York), October 1939; Rockefeller Grant, secondary School program correspondence.

35.3

A. Conger Goodyear, 1939; correspondence concerns gift of drawings to the R.C.A. Room of Contemporary Art dinner in honor of S.H. Knox prior to opening of R.C.A. Honorary membership in B.F.A.A., October 1939.

35.4

Walter C. Groupius: lecture, March 22, 1939

35.5

Albert Grotz (Gallery educational secretary): exhibitions, theory and practice, circa 1937-1940; includes short conceptual essay on exhibit history theory addressed to Gordon Washburn.

35.6

"H," 1939

35.7

John Haggerty (applicant for staff position), September 1939

35.8

Marie Harriman Gallery (New York), 1939

35.9

Marianna Hill: correspondence, 1938-1939

35.10

Jacob Hirsch (art dealer, New York), 1939

35.11

Hon. Agnes Horsefield (Kent, England), August 1939

35.12

Beatrice Howe (assistant Director), 1939; letters to Washburn in Europe regarding Gallery activities, Spring 1939.

35.13

"I," 1939

35.14

"J," 1939; correspondents include Randolph Wardell (sculptor), G. Jarquart (Paris) regarding purchase of Maillol's La Nuit, Amy B. Jones (Patteran artist) and O. Janse photographs of Cambodian sculpture.

35.15

Harry W. Jacobs (Buffalo Schools Superintendent), August 1939; concerns Secondary School Project.

35.16

Junior League Exhibitions, Buffalo and Rochester, March 1939; Gordon Washburn, judge.

35.17

"K," 1939

35.18

Kansas City, William R. Nelson Gallery of Art, 1939

35.19

Spencer Kellogg (Palm Springs, California): loans and gifts to A.A.G., 1939

35.20

Kennedy and Co. (New York), 1939

35.21

Theodore Keneflick (Buffalo, chairman of the B.F.A.A membership committee), 1939

35.22

M. Knoedler and Co: correspondence with Charles R. Henschel, president, 1939

35.23

Kraushaar Gallery (New York), 1939

35.24

Katherine Kuh Gallery (Chicago), 1939

35.25

Yasuo Kuniyoshi (artist, New York City), March 1939

35.26

"L," 1939; correspondents include Mrs. Gaston Lachaise regarding A.A.G. acquisition of Lehmbruck's Standing Woman (January).

35.27

Mrs. Paul Lamb (Shaker Heights, Ohio), February-April 1939; loans to Room of Contemporary Art.

35.28

Lawrence Lebduska (artist, New York), October-November 1939; exchange of painting in the R.C.A. Room of Contemporary Art.

35.29

Lecture suggestions, 1938-1939

35.30

Professor Lehmann-Hartleben, New York University, 1939; correspondence in connection with A.A.G. acquisition of seated figure, Roman marble; possible lecture by Aldo Neppi Modona.

35.31

R. Lerondelle (Paris): shipping of art works, 1939; purchases of modern French art by Washburn and Knox in Paris for the R.C.A. Room of Contemporary Art Spring 1939. Includes list of purchases made by the R.C.A. committee from January to March 1939.

35.32

Julian Levy Gallery (New York), February-March 1939

35.33

Library; contains reports of librarian Carol Romanelli to the Director, September 1939-April 1943, narrative and statistical.

35.34

Library Committee report, October 1939; report of B.F.A.A. committee listing expenditures, 1933-1939, makes recommendations [includes a letter from S.H. Knox regarding library].

35.35

Library purchases, 1939-1940

35.36

Library Director's Book Club purchases, 1939-1940

35.37

Library, correspondence with Directors, 1939-1940

35.38

William H. Littlefield (artist, Boston), March 1939

35.39

Mrs. Anson D. Lockhart (Palm Beach, Florida), 1939

35.40

C.T. Loo (oriental art dealer, New York and Paris), 1939

36.1

"M," 1939; correspondents include estate of L. Frank Messer regarding bequest to A.A.G. and Annie Nathan Meyer regarding information on the A.A.G. in 1906.

36.2

Pierre Matisse Gallery (New York), 1939; purchase of Henri Matisse's La Musique; other purchases and loans on approval.

36.3

Member's Advisory Committee (Council): organization and membership, 1939; minutes, correspondence and bylaws (ca. 1937-1939), correspondence with Charles Goodyear (chairman of membership committee) board changes; formation of M.A.C.

36.4

Membership department, 1933-1939; Mrs. Elizabeth Gillespies, phone solicitation of new members; monthly reports.

36.5

Membership, circa 1939; correspondence and printed matter concerning museum membership operations at the Museum of Modern Art and the Chicago Art Institute; includes total membership figures for the A.A.G., 1937-1939.

36.6

Milwaukee Art Institute, 1939

36.7

Movies: Albright Cinema Society, 1939; printed material, programming, financial reports (Fred Leitner, coordinator).

36.8

Movies: Albright Cinema Society, Executive Committee, 1939-1940

36.9

Music Calendar; musical events in Buffalo, 1938-1939.

36.10

"N," 1939; correspondents include Jonas Lie (president, National Academy of Design), H.H. Newton (artist, New York), and Sir Kenneth Clarke (National Gallery, London).

36.11

National Art Society, 1939; reproductions correspondence

36.12

New London, Connecticut: Lyman Allen Museum, 1939

36.13

New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1939

36.14

New York, Museum of Modern Art, 1939; extensive loan correspondence, M.O.M.A. exhibition, "Art in Our Time."

36.15

New York, New York University, 1939

36.16

New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, 1939

36.17

New York World's Fair, 1939; correspondence concerning the judging of local entries to the Fine Arts section of the fair; correspondence with Holger Cahill and A. Conger Goodyear concerning the exhibition of Contemporary Art.

36.18

New York World's Fair, Niagara Region, No. 12, 1939; includes local artist's entries, correspondence with William M. Kessel (secretary, Niagara Region No. 12), exhibition installation plans (1938-1940) and correspondence with contributing artists.

36.19

Nierendorf Gallery (New York): loans on approval, 1939

36.20

Northampton, Massachusetts, Smith College Museum of Art: correspondence (Jere Abbott, director), 1939

37.1

"O," 1939; correspondents include Mrs. John D. O'Brien regarding local artist John Rummell and the Joslyn Memorial Society of Liberal Arts regarding A.A.G. attendance.

37.2

"P," 1939

37.3

Robert T. Paine: lecture, Spring 1939

37.4

Georgette Passedoit (New York, modern art dealer): correspondence, 1939

37.5

Patteran Society of Buffalo, 1939; includes a checklist of the January 1939 Patteran Exhibit.

37.6

Perls Gallery (New York City): correspondence with Klaus Perls, 1939; R.C.A. Room of Contemporary Art purchase consideration.

37.7

Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1939

37.8

Philadelphia University Museum, 1939

37.9

Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute Department of Fine Arts, 1939; correspondence includes minutes of meetings of the American committee for an Exhibition of American Art at the Royal Academy (London) in 1941 (February to April 1939 as well as correspondence with director Homer St. Gaudens.

37.10

Portland Art Museum, 1939; correspondence with Robert T. Davis (director), September to December.

37.11

"R," 1939; correspondence includes Persis Weaver Roberston (lithographer) and a letter from Elbert Hubbard, II to S.H. Knox regarding painter Sandor Landeau.

37.12

Raymond and Raymond: reproduction correspondence, 1939

37.13

Louisa Robins (local amateur artist and member of the M.A.C): correspondence, 1939; concerning her travel to South Africa.

37.14

Rochester Memorial Art Gallery, 1939

37.15

Willaim A. Rogers, 1939

37.16

John Rothenstein (director, Tate Gallery, London): lecture correspondence, 1939

37.17

Anthony Ripportella (painting and restoration, New York), 1939

37.18

"S," 1939

37.19

San Francisco, Golden Gate International exhibition (Roland J. McKinney, director): correspondence, 1938-1939; A.A.G. loans

37.20

Schaeffer Galleries (New York), 1939

37.21

School of Fine Arts, Albright Art school: correspondence, 1939

37.22

Margaret Schulz (New York), 1939; correspondence concerning Impressionist art in the collection of G. Arndt, June to July 1939.

37.23

Arnold Seligmann, Rey and Co. (New York): correspondence with Paul M. Byk, 1939

37.24

Jacques Seligmann and Co. (New York): correspondence with Robert M. Levy, 1939

37.25

John I. Sewell (University at Buffalo Art History professor), 1939

37.26

Springfield (Massachusetts) Museum of Fine Arts, 1939

37.27

Stora (New York), 1939; possible purchase of a 13th century lion statue; photographs.

38.1

"T," 1939

38.2

Toledo Museum of Art, 1939

38.3

Toronto Art Gallery, 1939

38.4

"U," 1939

38.5

Utica, Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, 1939

38.6

"V," 1939

38.7

R.A. Van Clief (artist), 1939

38.8

"W," 1939

38.9

Washington, DC, American Federation of Arts, 1939

38.10

Washington, DC, United States Government, 1939

38.11

Philip J. Wickser: Room of Contemporary Art Committee correspondence, February-October 1939

38.12

Worchester Art Museum, 1939

38.13

"Y," 1939

38.14

Yamaka and Co. (New York), 1939

 

1940

38.15

"A," 1940

38.16

Activities folder, 1940; printed matter, A.A.G. events and activities.

38.17

Dorothy Adlow, Christian Science Monitor (Boston, Massachusetts), May-December 1940

38.18

Albany Institute of History and Art, 1940

38.19

Josef Albers, Black Mountain College (North Carolina), 1940

38.20

American Friends Service Committee Refugee Section, 1940; European refugee employment opportunities.

38.21

Applicants for positions, 1940

38.22

Armstrong-Roth-Cady and Co. [insurance], 1940; lists temporary exhibitions.

38.23

Arden Gallery (New York), 1940

38.24

G. Arndt (Long Island, New York), 1940; loan of Impressionist works to A.A.G.

38.25

Art Quarterly (Detroit), 1940

39.1

"B," 1940; includes correspondence with Charles D. Baker (Dunkirk artist) regarding local artists' meeting with Washburn and voting for Western New York exhibition jury.

39.2

Baltimore, Walter Art Gallery, 1940

39.3

Jay W. Baxtresser (Buffalo photographer), 1940; permanent collection photographs.

39.4

Alice Baldwin Beer, antique textiles (New York), 1940

39.5

Lydia H. Behrendt: recitals at A.A.G., 1940

39.6

Belgian Pavilion, New York World's Fair, Dr. J.A. Goris, 1940

39.7

Bignou Gallery, 1940; loan correspondence with Charles F. Keller

39.8

Boston, Institute of Modern Art, 1940; loans to Roualt Retrospective Exhibition, November 1940 to March 1941.

39.9

Boston Museum of Fine Arts, 1940

39.10

Stephen Bourgeois (New York Representative, Room of Contemporary Art): general correspondence, January-November 1940; correspondence concerns R.C.A. purchase consideration and plans for development, European affairs, accounts of the New York art world, and the success of the W.P.A. Federal Art Project (New York).

39.11

Joseph Brummer Gallery (New York), November 1939-November 1940

39.12

Brooklyn Museum, 1940

39.13

Bucholz Gallery (New York): correspondence with Curt Valentin, 1940

39.14

W.S. Budworth and Son: shipping of art, 1940; includes lists and insurance valuation of the Sidney Janis Collection of Modern Art.

39.15

Buffalo, City of, and Buffalo City Planning Association, 1940; includes text of a speech by Washburn on the development of Buffalo, April 1940.

39.16

Buffalo Courier Express: A.A.G. press releases, 1940

39.17

Buffalo Evening News: A.A.G. press releases, 1940

39.18

Buffalo Historical Society, 1940

39.19

Buffalo Public Libraries, Grosvenor Library, 1940

39.20

Buffalo organizations, miscellaneous, 1940

39.21

Buffalo Chamber of Commerce, Council on Social Welfare, 1940

39.22

Buffalo Museum of Science, 1940

39.23

Buffalo Public School Department, 1940

39.24

Buffalo State Teachers College, 1940

39.25

University of Buffalo: correspondence, 1940; concerning cooperation between University and the Albright Knox Art School in conferring B.F.A. degrees.

39.26

Charles Burchfield (artist, Gardenville, New York), December 10, 1940

40.1

"C," 1940

40.2

Cambridge, Fogg Art Museum: general correspondence, 1940

40.3

Cambridge, Fogg Art Museum: correspondence with Agnes Mongan, November 1939-November 1940.

40.4

Cambridge, Fogg Art Museum: correspondence with Paul J. Sachs, 1940

40.5

Carnegie Corporation Grant: Primary School Project; reports on use of grant, correspondence, 1939-1940.

40.6

Louis Carre (French Art dealer and expert, soldier), October 1939-October 1940; purchase considerations.

40.7

Carroll Carstairs Gallery (New York), 1940

40.8

George Cary (Buffalo architect), 1940; correspondence concerning Blocher memorial sculpture, May 1940.

40.9

Giovanni Castano (art dealer), Boston, November 1939-November 1940

40.10

Chicago, Art Institute, 1940; general and secondary school project correspondence.

40.11

Cincinnati Art Museum, 1940

40.12

Cleveland Art Museum, 1940

40.13

College Art Association, 1940; promotional correspondence and brochures for lectures including Gordon Washburn.

40.14

Cosmos Art Inc., F. Stern (New York), 1940

40.15

Frank Crowninshield (collector and magazine editor): lecture, A.A.G., February 1940

40.16

"D," 1940

40.17

Nassos Daphnis (artist, New York), 1940; R.C.A. Room of Contemporary Art purchases, July-December 1940.

40.18

E.S. David (ancient art dealer), 1940

40.19

Stuart Davis (artist, New York), June 1940

40.20

Detroit Institute of the Arts, 1940

40.21

Paul Drey (dealer, New York), 1940

40.22

Anna Glenny Dunbar (honorary curator of sculpture, Buffalo), November 1940

40.23

Durand-Ruel, Inc. (New York), 1940

40.24

Albert Duveen (New York), 1940

40.25

"E," 1940

40.26

"F," 1940; includes Frick Art Reference Library, complete list of A.A.G. acquisitions, 1939-June 1940.

40.27

Ferargil (New York), 1940

40.28

John Flanagan (sculptor, New York): telegrams, February 1940

41.1

"G," 1940; correspondence includes George Grosz (sculptor, New York) regarding judging of Western New York exhibition.

41.2

A. Conger Goodyear Family, 1940; correspondence includes and inventory of art in the estate of Mary Goodyear.

41.3

Greek war Relief Association: telegrams, 1940

41.4

Inglis Griswold (New York), 1940

41.5

"H," 1940

41.6

John Haggerty (former Gallery staff member): lecture, Fall 1940

41.7

T. Edward Hanley (Hollywood, California), 1940; correspondence concerns authentication of two Modligani's in Hanley collection.

41.8

Marie Harriman Gallery (New York), 1940

41.9

Tomas Harris (New York); loans on approval, April 1940.

41.10

Dalzel Hatfield Gallery (Los Angeles), 1940

41.11

Heeramaneck Galleries (New York), 1940

41.12

Nora M. Heerick and Mrs. Darwin Martin, June 1940; correspondence concerns Japanese screens from the Darwin Martin House, Buffalo, mentions F. Lloyd Wright.

41.13

Philip Hofer (Harvard Rare Book Library): correspondence, 1940

41.14

Frank Horovitz (artist, New York), 1940

41.15

"I," 1940

41.16

"J," 1940

41.17

"K," 1940

41.18

Laurie Kaldis (Publicity and Public Relations staff member), 1940; includes copy of a manuscript by Washburn on the purchasing policy of the Gallery, circa 1931-1940.

41.19

Kansas City, William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art, 1940

41.20

Spencer Kellogg, Jr.: correspondence, January-July 1940

41.21

Rockwell Kent (artist), 1940

41.22

Walt Kuhn (artist, New York), January 1940

41.23

M. Knoedler and Company (New York), 1940

41.24

"L," 1940

41.25

Lecture suggestions, 1940

41.26

Clare Leighton (woodcut artist): correspondence, February-September 1940

41.27

Life magazine: correspondence, 1940; publicity for Lackawanna sculptor, Louis Duglosz, winner of sculpture prize, Western New York exhibition.

41.28

C.T. Loo (New York and Paris), 1940

41.29

Los Angeles Museum of History, Science and Art, 1940

41.30

"M," 1940; correspondents include Ramos Martinez (artist, Los Angeles) represented in Room of Contemporary Art Mexican Art Exhibition and Lewis Mumford.

42.1

Robert Macbeth (New York), April 1940; possible purchase of water colors by Winslow Homer.

42.2

Pierre Matisse (New York), 1940; concerning gift of photographs of La Musique taken by Henri Matisse and various purchases for the Room of Contemporary Art, January to September 1940.

42.3

Members' Advisory Council: minutes of meetings, January 1940-April 1941; director's copies with notes.

42.4

Modern Mexican Art Exhibition, Room of Contemporary Art: press releases and publicity, May 1940

42.5

Milwaukee Art Institute, 1940

42.6

Bernard Meyers: contemporary art lecture, November 1940

42.7

"N," 1940

42.8

New York: Art News, 1940; press releases and articles on Gallery acquisitions

42.9

National Art Week (November 25-December 1, 1940): correspondence, October-December 1940; includes press releases and radio broadcasts; Gordon Washburn, local chairman.

42.10

New York, Metropolitan Museum, 1940; preparations for National Art Week [includes copy of letter from President Roosevelt to director of the Metropolitan]

42.11

New York, Museum of Modern Art, 1940

42.12

New York newspapers: press releases, 1940

42.13

New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, 1940

42.14

New York State World's Fair, 1940; correspondence with Hans Weber (Director of Exhibits) regarding local artists' exhibition, correspondence with local artists and sculptors as well as correspondence with Walter Pach (director, Masterpieces in Art exhibition) regarding Gallery loans.

42.15

Niagara Frontier Rose Society (P.G. Enser), 1940; monthly meetings at A.A.G.

42.16

Nierendorf Gallery (New York), 1940

42.17

Northampton, Massachusetts, Smith College Museum of Art (Jere Abbott, director), 1940

42.18

"O," 1940

42.19

Anna W. Olmstead (director, Syracuse Museum of Art): lecture, December 1940

42.20

"P," 1940

42.21

Parnassus, New York, 1940; press releases and correspondence

42.22

Georgette Passedoit, 1940

42.23

Perls Gallery (New York), 1940

42.24

Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1940

42.25

Philadelphia University Museum, 1940

42.26

Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute of Fine Arts, 1940

42.27

Princeton University, 1940; correspondence with Professor C.R .Morey (Committee for the Excavation of Antioch, Salamis Expedition).

43.1

"R," 1940

43.2

Raymond and Raymond (New York): reproductions, 1940

43.3

Anthony Ripportella (New York): art restoration, 1940

43.4

Rochester Memorial Art Gallery, 1940

43.5

William A. Rogers, 1940

43.6

David Rosen (conservation and art research, New York and Baltimore), 1940

43.7

Dr. Paul Rosenberg (collector, New York), April-November 1940

43.8

"S," 1940

43.9

Sam Salz (New York), 1940

43.10

San Francisco, California Palace of the Legion of Honor and DeYoung Memorial Museums, 1940

43.11

San Francisco, Golden Gate Exposition (Ansel Adams, director, Pageant of Photography): A.A.G. loans, 1940; also includes other correspondence with Walter Heil and Anna Marie Henle (art curators).

43.12

Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1940

43.13

G. Schmidt-Pizarro (Santiago, Chili), 1940; correspondence regarding Peruvian pre-Incan textiles.

43.14

Arnold Seligmann, Rey and Co., 1940

43.15

Jacques Seligmann and Co., 1940

43.16

Professor V. Simkovitch (Columbia University), 1940

43.17

Anthony Sisti (Buffalo), 1940

43.18

Marie Sterner (art dealer, New York), 1940; correspondence concerns exhibition of works by Lackawanna sculptor, Louis Duglosz.

43.19

James J. Sweeney: lecture, April 1940

43.20

"T," 1940; correspondence includes W.B. Tanner (Dates Laundry, Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo) regarding radio broadcast in connection with Gallery, Justin Thannhauser (Geneva and Paris) concerning possible purchase of works from the Quinn Collection.

43.21

Mrs. Reginald Taylor: Mexican Modern Art exhibition correspondence, April 1940; includes letters from Vincente de la Barrera and checklists.

43.22

Toronto Art Gallery, 1940

43.23

Toronto, Royal Ontario Museum, 1940

43.24

"U," 1940

43.25

"V," 1940

43.26

"W," 1940

43.27

Hudson D. Walker (art dealer, New York and California), 1940; Room of Contemporary Art purchases.

43.28

Washburn correspondence with Gallery Staff, June and August 1940

43.29

Washington, DC, American Association of Museums, 1940

43.30

Washington, DC, American Federation of Arts, 1940

43.31

Washington, DC, Freer Gallery (John Lodge, director), 1940

43.32

Julius H. Weitzner (dealer, New York), 1940; purchase consideration of a work by F. Bazille.

43.33

E. Weyhe Gallery, 1940

43.34

Wildenstein and Co., 1940

43.35

Emanual Winternitz: lecture, March 1940

43.36

Worchester Art Museum, 1940

43.37

"Y," 1940

43.38

Yamaka and Co., 1940; gift of Chinese Chimera to Gallery by Georgia M.G. Forman.

43.39

"Z," 1940

 

1941

44.1

"A," 1941

44.2

Activities, 1941; includes mimeographed circular letters and copies of speeches by Washburn [Note: printed material removed to Record Group 13].

44.3

J.N. Adam and Co. (Buffalo), March-April 1941; local artists' exhibition correspondence.

44.4

Mortimer Adler (Chicago), April 1941; correspondence regarding "democratization" of art museums.

44.5

Albany Institute of History and Art, January-March 1941

44.6

Josef Albers (Black Mountain College, North Carolina), January 1941

44.7

American British Art Center (New York); correspondence with president Ala Story.

44.8

American Institute for Iranian Art and Archeology, 1941

44.9

Apollo magazine (London), January-July 1941

44.10

Armstrong-Roth-Cady and Co., insurance, 1941; damage to art of local painters, fire in basement of Gallery.

44.11

Art Digest (New York), 1941

44.12

Art in America (Canondale, Connecticut), 1941

44.13

Art News (New York), 1941

44.14

Association of Art Museum Directors (Toledo), 1941

44.15

Association of Art Museum Directors Convention (Dayton, Ohio, May 1941): Gordon Washburn, convention program chairman, 1941; contains transcripts of speeches and questionnaires of round table discussions concerning the theme of "democratizing" art museums in America; includes Washburn's notes.

44.16

American Association of Museums Convention (Columbus, Ohio, May 1941), 1941; transcripts of speeches given on the subject of "democracy in art" by Ananda Coomaraswamy, Rene D'Harnoncourt, Robert T. Davis, and others.

44.17

"B," 1941; correspondents include Florence J. Bach (local artist), Otto Bemesch regarding the quality of a Rembrandt drawing under purchase consideration, and Charlotte Brand (French artist).

44.18

Baltimore, Walters Art Gallery, January-February 1941

44.19

Baltimore Museum of Art, 1941; correspondence with L. Cheek, director) regarding local artists' exhibitions at the Gallery, 1938-1941, statistics.

44.20

Bignou Gallery (New York and Paris), January-December 1941

44.21

Boston Institute of Modern Art, December 1940-June 1941

44.22

Boston Museum of Fine Arts, 1941; includes correspondence with Ananda Coomaraswamy.

44.23

Stephen Bourgeois (New York), 1941

44.24

Mortimer Brandt Gallery (New York), 1941

44.25

Brummer Galleries (New York), 1941

44.26

Buscholz Gallery (New York), 1941

44.27

W.S. Budworth and Son: art shipping, 1941

44.28

Buffalo, City of, 1941

44.29

Buffalo Courier Express: publicity correspondence, 1941

44.30

Buffalo Courier Express: articles by Virginia Menadue, 1940-1941; publicity regarding works in permanent collection, draft copies of newspaper articles.

45.1

Buffalo Evening News, 1941

45.2

Buffalo Grosvenor Library, 1941

45.3

Buffalo Museum of Science, 1941

45.4

Buffalo State Teacher's College, 1941; includes copy of college prospectus for 1940-1941 with photographs of A.A.G. and School of Fine Arts.

45.5

Buffalo, University of, 1941

45.6

Arthur E. Bye (Holicong, Pennsylvania), 1941

45.7

"C," 1941

45.8

Carroll Carstairs Gallery (New York), 1941

45.9

Chicago, Art Institute, 1941

45.10

Cincinnati Art Museum, 1941

45.11

Citizen's Committee for Government Art Projects (New York), 1941

45.12

Cleveland Art Museum, 1941

45.13

Cleveland School of Art, 1941

45.14

College Art Association, 1941

45.15

Contemporary Arts (New York), 1941

45.16

Ananda Coomaraswamy, 1941; articles, essays and speeches, typescripts.

45.17

Ralston Crawford (instructor, School of Fine Arts), 1941

45.18

Council on National Defense, 1941; Commercial and Cultural relations between the American Republics (South America loan exhibition correspondence).

45.19

"D," 1941

45.20

Delphian Society, 1941

45.21

Detroit Institute of Fine Arts, 1941

45.22

Downtown Gallery, Edith Halpert, 1941

45.23

Paul Drey (New York), 1941

45.24

Durand-Ruel, Inc. (New York), 1941

45.25

Duveen Bros., Inc. (New York), 1941

45.26

"E," 1941

45.27

"Ecuadorian" correspondence, September-November 1941; correspondence with John Abbott (chairman) and Philip Adams (executive secretary) Committee on Art, Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs, executive Office of the President, also includes correspondence with Ludwig Bemelmans.

45.28

Educational work in museums (Elinor Plumley, educational advisor), 1941

45.29

"F," 1941

45.30

Bryant Fleming (print collector): correspondence, 1941

45.31

Alfred M. Frankenfurter: lecture, May 1941

45.32

"G," 1941

45.33

A. Conger Goodyear (New York): gifts to permanent collection, December 1941

45.34

Walter Gropius: "Site and Shelter: A Contemporary Problem" lecture, January 1941; includes manuscript outline of lecture, correspondence September 1940-March 1941.

46.1

"H," 1941

46.2

Marie Harriman Gallery (New York), 1941

46.3

Hayes Storage (New York), 1941

46.4

"I," 1941

46.5

Indianapolis, John Herron Art Institute, 1941

46.6

"J," 1941

46.7

"K," 1941

46.8

Edmond Kapp (artist, London and Bath, England), February-November 1941

46.9

M. Knoedler and Co. (New York), 1941; includes correspondence with art critic Royal Cortissoz.

46.10

"L," 1941

46.11

Lecture suggestions, 1941; contains correspondence and printed material with photographs of lecturers.

46.12

"Lists", 1941-1950; includes lists of paintings in dealer-owned galleries, lists of artists, lists of restorers and conservators, conservation methods.

46.13

Library: Director's Book Club, 1940-1943

46.14

Library: Book purchases, 1940-1941

46.15

Life magazine (New York), 1941

46.16

C.T. Loo (New York), 1941

46.17

"M," 1941

46.18

Pierre Matisse (art dealer, New York), 1941; Room of Contemporary Art purchase considerations.

46.19

Memphis, Brooks Memorial Art Gallery, 1941

46.20

Milwaukee Art Institute, 1941

46.21

Movie Series, 1941; financial data, programming.

46.22

"N," 1941

46.23

National Art Week, November 17-26, 1941; government sponsored local art fairs.

46.24

National Art Week: attendance, November 22-November 24, 1941

46.25

National Art Week: Artists' Ball, November 25, 1941

46.26

National Art Week: catalogue of Albany region exhibits, November 1941 [for catalogue and information on art exhibited at the A.A.G. during the Art Fair, see collection AK3.1]

46.27

National Art Week: Finance Committee, November 1941

46.28

National Art Week: Fraternal and Veterans Societies' Night, November 21, 1941

46.29

National Art Week Review , November 25, 1941

46.30

National Art Week: arts and crafts demonstrations, decorations, and refreshments committees, November 1941

47.1

National Art Week: miscellaneous information, 1941; printed material and correspondence

47.2

National Art Week: Newcomers' Night, November 19, 1941

47.3

National Art Week: Official Opening, November 17, 1941; includes invitation lists.

47.4

National Art Week: District Chairman's notes, November 1941

47.5

National Art Week: programs, committees, meetings, October-November 1941

47.6

National Art Week: Poster Committee, 1941 [Mrs. John Alexander, chairman]

47.7

National Art Week: promotion and publicity, November 1941

47.8

National Art Week: sales of art, November 1941

47.9

National Art Week: sample letters, circa 1941

47.10

National Art Week: activities in schools, November 1941

47.11

National Art Week: Women's Organizations Day, November 1941

47.12

National Emergency Folder, 1941-1942; War-time measure for museums, Air Raid Precautions, redirection of activities to benefit the military-industrial effort.

47.13

New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1941

47.14

New York, Museum of Modern Art, 1941

47.15

New York, Whitney Museum of Modern Art, 1941

47.16

Northampton, Smith College Museum of Art, 1941

47.17

"O," 1941

47.18

"P," 1941

47.19

Philadelphia, Museum of Art and University Museums, 1941

47.20

Photographic Arts Society of Buffalo, 1941-1944

47.21

Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute Department of Fine Arts, 1941

47.22

Press releases, 1940-1941

47.23

"R," 1941; includes correspondence with film director Jean Renoir.

47.24

Rhode Island School of Design Museum of Art, 1941

47.25

Rochester Memorial Art Gallery, 1941

47.26

Room of Contemporary Art, Committee of Administration: minutes of meetings, 1941 [director Gordon Washburn's copies]

47.27

Paul Rosenberg (art dealer, New York): purchase correspondence, January-July 1941

47.28

"S," 1941

48.1

San Francisco, Museum of Art, 1941

48.2

Heinrich Schwarz: documentation of permanent collection project, 1940-1942; includes correspondence with the Emergency Committee in Aid of Displaced Foreign Scholars, Louis Stern and Edward M.M. Warburg; concerns financial arrangements for the hiring of Schwarz (an Austrian museum professional) to conduct the project.

48.3

Secondary School Project: introduction to Final Reports written by Washburn, 1940-1941

48.4

Arnold Seligmann, Rey and Co. (New York), 1941; correspondence with Paul M. Byk.

48.5

Jacques Seligmann and Co. (New York), 1941

48.6

E. and A. Silberman Galleries, 1941

48.7

"T," 1941

48.8

Time magazine (New York), 1941

48.9

Toledo Museum of Art, 1941

48.10

Tonying and Co., January 1941

48.11

Toronto Art Gallery, May 1941

48.12

"U," 1941

48.13

"V," 1941

48.14

"W," 1941

48.15

Hudson Walker (art dealer and collector, California), August-December 1941

48.16

Maynard Walker Gallery (New York), January-June 1941

48.17

Washburn articles, lectures, and correspondence with Gallery staff, 1939-1942; includes manuscripts of articles and lectures.

48.18

Washington, DC, American Association of Museums, 1941

48.19

Washington, DC, American Federation of Arts, 1941

48.20

Washington, DC, Dumbarton Oaks Research Institute, 1941

48.21

Washington, DC, National Gallery, opening of, 1941

48.22

Washington, DC, Phillips Collection, 1941

48.23

Washington, DC, United States Government activities, 1941

48.24

Edwin J. Weiss (Buffalo), 1941

48.25

C. Edward Wells (oriental art dealer, New York), 1941

48.26

Western New York Federation of Women's Clubs, 1941

48.27

Philip Wickser (Buffalo), 1941

48.28

Wildenstein and Co. (New York), 1941

48.29

Edgar Wind: lecture series in conjunction with the University at Buffalo, October-December 1941; contains correspondence, printed material, press releases; [inclusive dates: 1940-1941]

48.30

Worcester Art Museum, 1941

48.31

"Y," 1941

48.32

"Z," 1941

 


 
Search Terms

 
Contributors
Washburn, Gordon B. (Gordon Bailey), 1904-
Albright Art Gallery (Buffalo, N.Y.)
Albright-Knox Art Gallery
Sachs, Paul J. (Paul Joseph), 1878-1965
Bourgeois, Stephan 

Subject Terms
Sachs, Paul J. (Paul Joseph), 1878-1965
Bourgeois, Stephan
Art museums--Exhibitions--New York (State)--Buffalo
Artists--Correspondence
Artists and museums--New York (State)--Buffalo
Art museums--United States--Records and correspondence 


 
ASSOCIATED MATERIAL

 
Separated Materials
Washburn's correspondence from October through December of 1931 is located in AK2.4, William M. Hekking Director's Records.

Photographs providing a visual record of the Gallery, activities, and staff were removed and are saved in Record Group 6, Special Formats..

Notices and announcement documenting activities at the Gallery were removed to Record Group 13, Publications. 

Related Resources
Related collections at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Archives includes:

AK2.4, William M. Hekking Director's Records, 1925-1931. Finding aid available online.


 
Gallery Archives
Albright-Knox Art Gallery, G. Robert Strauss, Jr. Memorial Library 
 

Contact Information
G. Robert Strauss, Jr. Memorial Library
Albright-Knox Art Gallery
1285 Elmwood Avenue
Buffalo, New York 14222-1096
716.270.8240 TEL
716.882.6213 FAX
artref@albrightknox.org

© 2008 Albright-Knox Art Gallery. All rights reserved.