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La Rigole à St. Privé, Yonne (Rivulet at St. Privé, Yonne)

Public Domain

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Public Domain

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Public Domain

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Henri-Joseph Harpignies

French, 1819-1916

La Rigole à St. Privé, Yonne (Rivulet at St. Privé, Yonne), 1902

oil on canvas

support: 32 1/4 x 26 inches (81.91 x 66.04 cm); framed: 45 x 38 1/2 x 4 1/2 inches (114.3 x 97.79 x 11.43 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Bequest of George B. and Jenny R. Mathews, 1952

1952:2.2

More Details

Inscriptions

signature, dated / lower left / h j harpignies 1902

Provenance

George B. and Jenny R. Mathews, Buffalo;
bequeathed by them to the Albright Art Gallery, 1952

Class

Paintings

Work Type

Oil painting

Information may change due to ongoing research.Glossary of Terms

The landscape was a favorite subject of Henri-Joseph Harpignies. Around 1850, after completing an apprenticeship in Paris with artist Jean-Alexis Achard (French, 1807–1884), Harpignies traveled to Italy—a place to which he would repeatedly return throughout his lifetime. While Harpignies’s work stylistically parallels that of his close friend Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot and other masters of the Barbizon School, he chose to remain on the periphery. The Barbizon painters challenged preconceived notions of the landscape genre, inviting the public to appreciate it on the same level as historical or mythological subjects.

Rivulet at St. Privé (Yonne) depicts a farmstead, most likely near the artist’s home and studio in the Loire Valley. Reminiscent of Corot’s broad, rapid brushwork and monochromatic undertones, it exemplifies the later style of Harpignies’s body of work. This shift in technique, which occurred around the turn of the twentieth century, was prompted, at least in part, by his failing eyesight. Harpignies was forced to focus less on details and more on simply bringing larger shapes into effect. In a work like this one, the luminous colors of his earlier canvases were replaced with an overall silver tonality.

Label from Monet and the Impressionist Revolution, 1860–1910, November 15, 2015–March 20, 2016

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