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Conger

Alexander Calder (American, 1898-1976). Conger, ca. 1950. Aluminum, steel and paint, 43 x 69 x 38 inches (109.2 x 175.3 x 96.5 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Gift of ACG Trust, 1965 (1965:16). © Calder Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

© Calder Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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© Calder Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Calder Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Alexander Calder

American, 1898-1976

Conger, ca. 1950

aluminum, steel, and paint

overall: 43 x 69 x 38 inches (109.22 x 175.26 x 96.52 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of ACG Trust, 1965

1965:16

More Details

Provenance

Ed. Stone;
gifted by Stone to A. Conger Goodyear;
donated by the A. Conger Goodyear trust to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, 1965

Class

Sculpture (visual work)

Work Type

Construction (sculpture)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Alexander Calder conceived of the idea to create mobile sculptures during a visit to the Paris studio of fellow artist Piet Mondrian in 1930. During the visit, Calder suggested that Mondrian make his iconic squares and rectangles “vibrate and oscillate.” While Mondrian was not interested in the idea, Calder followed through on his own suggestion. Conger incorporates Calder’s iconic red, yellow, blue, and black color scheme. It was originally a gift from the American architect Edward Durell Stone to Albright-Knox patron A. Conger Goodyear. It resided with Goodyear at his home in Old Westbury, Long Island—which was designed by Stone—until Goodyear’s death in 1964, after which it was bequeathed to the museum. Calder named the sculpture after its former owner in 1965.

Label from Artists in Depth: Arp, Miró, Calder, March 25, 2011–April 15, 2012

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