Skip to Main Content

Seated Nymph with Spreading Skirt from the series Nymphs and Satyrs

© Succession Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Succession Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Succession Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Succession Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Succession Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Succession Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Pablo Picasso

Spanish, 1881-1973

Seated Nymph with Spreading Skirt from the series Nymphs and Satyrs, 1964

glass

overall: 6 3/16 x 3 1/2 x 6 1/8 inches (15.72 x 8.89 x 15.56 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Mrs. Nell E. Wendler and James S. Ely, Jr. in memory of Mrs. Nell Schoellkopf Ely Miller, 1972

1972:10.9

More Details

Inscriptions

inscription / [not by artist's hand] / Picasso '64

Provenance

from the artist to Peggy Guggenheim, Venice;
Nell Schoellkopf Ely Miller, Buffalo, by 1967;
estate of Nell Schoellkopf Ely Miller;
presented by Mrs. Nell E. Wendler and James s. Ely, Jr. to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, October 1972

Class

Sculpture

Work Type

Sculpture (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Mythological creatures appear throughout Pablo Picasso’s body of work, and in the mid-1940s he created a series of fourteen small clay sculptures depicting nymphs and satyrs sitting, standing, and playing instruments. The works were then cast in bronze and, later, made in ceramic. In the mid-1960s, he revisited the motif and transposed the playful figures into cast blue glass in collaboration with master glassmaker Egidio Costantini (Italian, 1912–2007). Picasso was attracted to these characters’ playfulness, and they served as poignant symbols within his personal iconography. One of the satyr figures here is said to be a self-portrait of the artist.

Label from Picasso: The Artist and His Models, November 5, 2016–February 19, 2017

Back to Top