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Homme vu par une fleur (Man Seen by a Flower)

© Estate of Jean Arp / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Germany

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Jean Arp / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Germany

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Jean Arp / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Germany

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Jean Arp / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Germany

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Jean (Hans) Arp

French, born Germany, 1886-1966

Homme vu par une fleur (Man Seen by a Flower), 1958

bronze

Edition: edition of approximately 400

overall: 2 1/4 x 4 x 4 1/2 inches (5.72 x 10.16 x 11.43 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Bequest of Gordon M. Smith, 1979

1979:21.7

More Details

Provenance

commissioned from the artist by L'Association Sans But Lucratif for the Expositions Internationales des Beaux-Arts, Brussels, 1958;
presented to Gordon M. Smith, Buffalo, 1958;
bequest of Gordon M. Smith to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, September 1979

Class

Sculpture (visual work)

Work Type

Cast (sculpture)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

In 1958, the organizers of the Brussels World’s Fair commissioned Jean (Hans) Arp to create a small-scale bronze sculpture. Casts of the sculpture were presented to the individuals who contributed to the success of the Fair’s exhibition 50 ans d’art modern (50 Years of Modern Art), including former Albright-Knox Director Gordon M. Smith. Man Seen by a Flower was one of Smith's prized possessions and was displayed on his desk throughout his tenure at the museum. While small in stature, the sculpture encapsulates all of the qualities of Arp’s major works. Its abstracted, biomorphic form flows from the head of a man to his torso and outstretched legs, and the work bears a notable resemblance to Arp’s Somersault. The element of chance that Arp often explored is also present—there is no definitive way to the view this work, and it can be installed in numerous ways.

Label from Artists in Depth: Arp, Miró, Calder, March 25, 2011–April 15, 2012

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