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View of Niagara Falls from Goat Island

Public Domain

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Public Domain

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Public Domain

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

unknown

nationality and dates unknown

View of Niagara Falls from Goat Island, ca. 1850

oil on canvas

support: 28 7/8 x 35 7/8 inches (73.34 x 91.12 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch, 1981

1981:30.7

More Details

Provenance

Surf Old and New, Inc., New York;
Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch, Cambridge, Md., and New York City, 1964;
Estate of Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch;
donated to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, June 1981

Class

Paintings (visual works)

Work Type

Oil painting (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

During the early nineteenth century, one of the most popular sets of prints sold to tourists at Niagara Falls was a group of four aquatint engravings based on watercolor paintings by William James Bennett. The first two prints, published in 1829, are conventional compositions that depict the grand cascade of the Falls from below. The second two, published in 1831, show it from more unusual vantage points on Goat Island. One of these later versions, entitled Niagara Falls: View of the British Falls Taken from Goat Island, must have been especially appealing to the unknown artist who painted this work. This version faithfully reproduces nearly all of the elements in Bennet’s composition, including the placement of the trees in the foreground, the configuration of the Falls, the rocks in the water, the bridge, and even the little trees in the background silhouetted against the sky. The transformation of a painting into a print into yet another painting was not uncommon in early American art, and many amateur artists learned their craft by copying easily obtainable images.

Label from Picturing Niagara, September 30, 2017–August 5, 2018

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