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Untitled

© Jennifer Steinkamp

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Untitled

© Jennifer Steinkamp

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Untitled

© Jennifer Steinkamp

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Untitled

© Jennifer Steinkamp

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Untitled

© Jennifer Steinkamp

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Untitled

© Jennifer Steinkamp

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Jennifer Steinkamp

American, born 1958

Untitled, 1993

computer video installation

projected image area (approximate): 186 x 60 inches (472.44 x 152.4 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Mildred Bork Conners & Joseph E. Conners, Albert H. Tracy, Edmund Hayes, Mrs. John T. Elfvin, Charlotte A. Watson and Gallery Volunteers in honor of Robert T. Buck Funds, 2005

2005:38

More Details

Provenance

October 18, 2005, sold by ACME, Los Angeles, to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery

Class

Video art
Projections

Work Type

Video art
Projection (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

With its vibrant-hued droplets quivering like a spill of liquid mercury, Jennifer Steinkamp’s Untitled resembles nothing so much as a tessellating stained-glass window or a watery, rainbow-colored surface. These two possible references—one architectural and one natural—define the twin poles of the artist’s practice. Since the late 1980s, Steinkamp has used her training in motion graphics and computer animation to create a range of installations that relate to the natural world in their imagery. While the allusion in Untitled is fairly abstract, other works such as Dervish I or Pillow Fight include photorealistic simulations of swaying, seasonally changing trees or feathers lazily succumbing to gravity.

The poetic verisimilitude of Steinkamp’s animations is strategic. Her installations do not disassociate us from reality but rather actively reshape our phenomenological understanding of the concrete architectural spaces we inhabit. As projected onto a floor in the museum, Untitled dissolves the assumed stability of this surface.

Label from Screen Play: Life in an Animated World, June 20–September 13, 2015

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