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Mississippi Gottdam

© Mark Bradford

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Mark Bradford

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Mark Bradford

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Mark Bradford

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Mark Bradford

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Mark Bradford

American, born 1961

Mississippi Gottdam, 2007

billboard paper, photomechanical reproductions, acrylic gel medium, comic-book paper, wrapping paper, and additional mixed media on canvas

support: 102 x 144 inches (259.08 x 365.76 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, 2008

2008:14

More Details

Inscriptions

inscription / back / MISSISSIPPI GOTTDAM
signature, dated / back / 2007 / M

Provenance

the artist;
Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York;
June 24, 2008, purchased by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo

Class

Collages (visual works)

Work Type

Collage (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Although Mark Bradford creates abstract works, he is always informed by the social and political environment. The title of this work is inspired by Nina Simone’s 1964 song “Mississippi Goddam,” a plaintive cry for urgent social change and racial equality. In this work, the title also references the devastating impact of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans in 2005. Using debris he collected from New Orleans’s streets, Bradford created an abstract image that also serves as a critique of the slowness of recovery efforts in low-income communities after Katrina. He then laid a sheet of silver leaf over the initial layer of found paper and used a sander to recover portions of the submerged colors and text. The resulting image appears at once like a dilapidated wall and a seascape, with the undulating cuts recalling oncoming waves and the colorful paper fragments evoking flotsam and jetsam after the deluge.

Label from Shade: Clyfford Still / Mark Bradford, May 26–October 2, 2016

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