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Untitled (Mylar)

Tara Donovan (American, born 1969). Untitled (Mylar), 2007. Mylar and glue, 30 x 248 x 203 inches (76.2 x 629.9 x 515.6 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Gift of Mrs. Georgia M. G. Forman, by exchange, 2008 (2008:19a-x).

© Tara Donovan

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Tara Donovan

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Tara Donovan

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Tara Donovan

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Tara Donovan

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Tara Donovan

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Tara Donovan

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Tara Donovan

American, born 1969

Untitled (Mylar), 2007

Mylar and glue

overall: 30 x 248 x 203 inches (76.2 x 629.92 x 515.62 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Mrs. Georgia M. G. Forman, by exchange, 2008

2008:19a-x

More Details

Class

Sculpture

Work Type

Sculpture (visual work)

Information may change due to ongoing research.Glossary of Terms

The series of projects I developed with Mylar was a part of an investigation of materials with certain physical traits that can somehow be activated outside of the material or object itself. Transparency and reflectivity are important because these traits are responsive in the sense that they can amplified or subdued according to the light conditions around them. These traits encourage a type of chameleonic masking effect that occurs with a quantitative accumulation of the material to which they are attached. The Mylar installation evolved by experimenting with how to use the reflective material volumetrically in order not only to create a seductive object but also to attempt to fracture the optical depth of field upon close viewing.

Artist statement, May 2016

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