Skip to Main Content

Trojan

© Tom Sachs

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Tom Sachs

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Tom Sachs

American, born 1966

Trojan, 2008

cast silicon bronze and photo-etching with ammonium sulfide

Edition: 3/5

overall: 88 x 30 x 18 inches (223.52 x 76.2 x 45.72 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Purchased with funds by exchange: Gift of Mrs. George A. Forman, Fellows for Life Fund, Gift of Mrs. Georgia M. G. Forman, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Lucien Garo, Charles W. Goodyear Fund, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Robins, Jr., James H. Madison Fund, Bequest of Arthur B. Michael, Bequest of John Mortimer Schiff, Gift of Gordon Washburn, Gift of Miss Amelia E. White, and Philip J. Wickser Fund, 2008

2008:44

More Details

Class

Sculpture (visual work)

Work Type

Cast (sculpture)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Tom Sachs is known for creating elaborate installations that include a variety of objects commonly found in the public domain and commercial marketplace. With the incorporation of simple, recognizable elements, Trojan cleverly articulates modernist concepts and forms in layman’s terms. The work was made from a cast of an amalgamation of dysfunctional or rudimentary components: lifeless car batteries scattered throughout Sachs’s studio, a carpeted dolly he found in the street, cinder blocks, and wood wedges. Trojan is one of a series of sculptures that all carry virile brand names; some other works in the series are titled Die Hard and Duralast. The notion of vigorous masculinity suggested by these titles is also evoked in the works’ compositions, which not only read as phallic but also totemic. In lieu of simply invoking tribal ancestry, Trojan also suggests the dominance of the consumer world and the commodification of contemporary culture.

Label from For the Love of Things: Still Life, February 27–May 29, 2016

Back to Top