Skip to Main Content

Doorway I

Rachel Whiteread (British, born 1963). Doorway I, 2010. Resin, 80 3/8 x 29 3/4 x 3 inches (204.2 x 75.6 x 7.7 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Bequest of Arthur B. Michael, by exchange and Gift of Mrs. Georgia M. G. Forman, by exchange, 2011 (2011:30). © 2010 Rachel Whiteread, Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York

© Rachel Whiteread

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Rachel Whiteread

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Rachel Whiteread

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Rachel Whiteread

British, born 1963

Doorway I, 2010

resin

Edition: unique

overall: 80 3/8 x 29 3/4 x 3 inches (204.15 x 75.56 x 7.65 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Bequest of Arthur B. Michael, by exchange and Gift of Mrs. Georgia M. G. Forman, by exchange, 2011

2011:30

More Details

Provenance

Luhring Augustine Gallery, New York;
June 14, 2011, purchased by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo

Class

Sculpture (visual work)

Work Type

Cast (sculpture)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Rachel Whiteread makes her sculptures by casting, a process in which an artist makes a mold of an object, fills the mold with a liquid material that hardens (in this case, resin), and then removes the mold, leaving behind a solid sculpture. The sculpture is a one-to-one copy of the shape of the original object, but it is also a negative copy of the shape of the mold, whose inner void it manifests in solid form. In this sense, all cast sculptures conjure absence and loss, and so it is a particularly appropriate method for Whiteread, who has cast various objects designated obsolete and destroyed in the name of progress, including furniture, staircases, water towers, and even an entire house. Seemingly weightless, her pale-hued resin sculptures of familiar items cast prominent shadows, haunting galleries with their ghostly presence. Uselessly propped up against the wall, Doorway I may remind us of a collapsing structure and, more broadly, of all the homes we’ve lost or left behind. It insists that the architectural elements that shape our lives—including even those as humble as a nondescript door—can be conduits of personal and cultural memory.

Label from Window to Wall: Art from Architecture, November 18, 2017–March 18, 2018

Back to Top