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Tear

© Jaye Rhee

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Jaye Rhee

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Jaye Rhee

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Jaye Rhee

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Jaye Rhee

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Jaye Rhee

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Jaye Rhee

South Korean, born 1973

Tear, 2002

four-channel video installation, sound

Edition: 2/5 plus 2 artist's proofs

running time: 4 minutes, 7 seconds

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Bequest of Arthur B. Michael, by exchange, 2011

2011:8

More Details

Provenance

Stephan Stoyanov Gallery, New York;
January 25, 2011, purchased by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo

Class

Video art

Work Type

Multi-channel video installation

Information may change due to ongoing research.Glossary of Terms

Jaye Rhee’s performance-based video installations explore what she refers to as “authentic desire.” In her work, she suggests the indeterminacy of time by presenting images that juxtapose apparently real-life scenarios against the backdrop of fake, yet seemingly authentic, environments. In Rhee’s four-channel video installation Tear, a simple action becomes a poignant gesture. An image of white cloth stretches across four screens; Rhee slowly walks through the screens ripping the fabric as she proceeds from one edge of the frame to the other, gesturing to perseverance and strength amid adversity. According to Rhee, “My goal is to create a new visual space in which artifice evaporates through the very naked presentation of images as naked materials. This ‘honest artifice’ would ultimately lead one into an experience of reflection about one’s own nostalgia.”

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