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Cycle

Sopheap Pich (Cambodian, born 1971). Cycle, 2011. Bamboo, wire, and glue; 116 x 165 1/2 x 24 1/2 inches (294.6 x 420.4 x 62.2 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Gift of Mrs. Georgia M. G. Forman, by exchange, 2014 (2014:4). © 2011 Sopheap Pich

© Sopheap Pich

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Sopheap Pich

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Sopheap Pich

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Sopheap Pich

Cambodian, born 1971

Cycle, 2011

bamboo, wire, and glue

overall: 116 x 165 1/2 x 24 1/2 inches (294.64 x 420.37 x 62.23 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Mrs. Georgia M. G. Forman, by exchange, 2014

2014:4

Currently On View

More Details

Inscriptions

signature, dated / back, center / S.PICH 2011

Provenance

Tyler Rollins Fine Art, New York;
January 21, 2014, purchased by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo

Class

Sculpture (visual work)

Work Type

Sculpture (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Sopheap Pich was born in Battambang, Cambodia, during a period of civil war. After fleeing first to Thailand and living in refugee camps, his family eventually immigrated to the United States. Cycle and many of Pich’s other works feature oblique references to his early experiences and to the materials common to daily life in Southeast Asia. After returning to Cambodia in 2002, Pich turned his attention to making sculptures that, like the artist himself, are a hybrid of cultural traditions. Using materials such as such as rattan, bamboo, and burlap culled from rice bags, he reimagines the formal structures of Western modern art, particularly the grid. In Cycle, the irregular grid becomes a reference to the body, thanks to its organ-like shape and the use of organic bamboo that, although fragile, proves resilient under pressure.

Label from We the People: New Art from the Collection, October 23, 2018–July 21, 2019

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