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Lovers

Rosalyn Drexler (American, born 1926). Lovers, 1963. Acrylic and paper collage on canvas, 55 1/4 x 52 inches (140.3 x 132.1 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, by exchange, 2016 (2016:1). © 1963 Rosalyn Drexler / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York

© Rosalyn Drexler / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Rosalyn Drexler / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Rosalyn Drexler / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Rosalyn Drexler

American, born 1926

Lovers, 1963

acrylic and paper collage on canvas

support: 55 1/4 x 52 inches (140.34 x 132.08 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, by exchange, 2016

2016:1

More Details

Inscriptions

signature, dated / verso

Provenance

the artist;
Pace Gallery, New York;
Turnberry Associates, Miami;
Garth Greenan Gallery, New York;
sold to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, March 1, 2016

Class

Collages
Paintings

Work Type

Collage (visual work)
Acrylic painting (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Drawn to popular culture themes and representations of gender in the mass media, Rosalyn Drexler began using pop-inspired imagery in 1961, on the heels of Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. Drexler altered a publicity poster for the 1957 movie Jailhouse Rock depicting Elvis Presley and Judy Tyler embracing as the basis for the kissing couple in Lovers. These figures are set against a background of collaged paper that features legible snippets such as “co-starring,” “released,” “am I faris,” and “willi.” A man and a woman are seated atop this amalgamation of text. They do not interact, and their body language conveys doubt, uncertainty, and guilt. The overall composition implies that the figures in the foreground and those above may represent the same couple at two different points in their relationship: a moment of passion and one of betrayal.

Label from Giant Steps: Artists and the 1960s, June 30–December 30, 2018

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