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Money

Milena Bonilla (Colombian, born 1975). Detail of Money, 2012. Set of 260 pencil frottage drawings of coins on paper, 5 x 13 inches (12.7 x 33 cm) each. Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; By exchange: Fellows for Life Fund, Charles Clifton Fund, Charles Clifton and James G. Forsyth Funds, and Gift of Dermotte and Company, 2016 (2016:3a-d). © 2012 Milena Bonilla

© Milena Bonilla

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Milena Bonilla

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Milena Bonilla

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Milena Bonilla

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Milena Bonilla

Colombian, born 1975

Money, 2012

set of 260: pencil frottage of coins on paper

sheet (each): 5 x 13 inches (12.7 x 33.02 cm); each (framed): 36 5/8 x 58 5/16 x 1 1/8 inches (93.03 x 148.11 x 2.86 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

By exchange: Fellows for Life Fund, Charles Clifton Fund, Charles Clifton and James G. Forsyth Funds and Gift of Dermotte and Company, 2016

2016:3a-d

More Details

Provenance

the artist;
Mor Charpentier, Paris;
sold to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, May 10, 2016

Class

Drawings (visual works)

Work Type

Drawing (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Throughout her work, Milena Bonilla creates a narrative thread linking the economy, politics, and world geography to the discord between nature and material culture. Bonilla proposes new ways to chart, and therefore address, such issues. To create Money, Bonilla made 260 rubbings off the surfaces of coins from developing nations on which plants or animals are illustrated. She then used these drawings to create a series of “maps” where nations are not demarcated by territorial boundaries but, instead, are represented by their native species. Her process recalls the aesthetics of historic cartography, in which regions were often correlated with drawings of their native flora and fauna. Here, countries are identified by the natural resources they have chosen to associate with monetary value. Bonilla’s decision to use coins conveys the threat that consumerist culture poses to our ecological resources. Hers is an imaginary system where nature rises above flags or territorial borders. However, in order to read her work as a mapped interpretation of the world, you would need to be familiar with all the nations associated with the coins she employs—seemingly an intentionally impossible feat.

Label from Drawing: The Beginning of Everything, July 8–October 15, 2017

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