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Rifugiato Mappa del Mondo (Refugee Map of the World)

Dan Halter (Zimbabwean, born 1977). Rifugiato Mappa del Mondo (Refugee Map of the World), 2016. Stitched-together new and used plastic-weave shopping bags, edition: 7 (unique) from a series of 8, 72 x 150 inches (182.9 x 381 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; By Exchange: Elisabeth H. Gates Fund, James G. Forsyth Fund, Fellows for Life Fund, George Cary Fund and Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Lucien Garo, 2016 (2016:4). © 2016 Dan Halter. Image courtesy of the artist and WHATIFTHEWORLD.

© Dan Halter. Image courtesy of the artist and WHATIFTHEWORLD.

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Dan Halter

Zimbabwean, born 1977

Rifugiato Mappa del Mondo (Refugee Map of the World), 2016

stitched-together new and used plastic-weave shopping bags

Edition: 7 (unique) from a series of 8

overall: 72 x 150 inches (182.88 x 381 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

By Exchange: Elisabeth H. Gates Fund, James G. Forsyth Fund, Fellows for Life Fund, George Cary Fund and Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Lucien Garo, 2016

2016:4

More Details

Provenance

from the artist to WHATIFTHEWORLD Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa, 2016;
sold to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, May 10, 2016

Class

Textile art

Work Type

Wall hanging

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Dan Halter often addresses migration, displacement, and dislocated identity in his work. Halter was born to Swiss parents in Rhodesia, an unrecognized state that later became the Republic of Zimbabwe, and he now lives and works in South Africa. His Rifugiato Mappa del Mondo (Refugee Map of the World) is constructed from cheaply produced plastic-mesh bags, which are often carried by refugees. Unlike traditional political maps, in which each country is differentiated by color and sharply outlined boundaries, Halter’s map foregrounds the arbitrariness of borders and the ubiquity and similarity of the immigrant experience the world over. The patchwork map also suggests that identity is defined not by one country but by a combination of memories and experiences.

Label from We the People: New Art from the Collection, October 23, 2018–July 21, 2019

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