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Tembok Toleransi #2 (Tolerance Wall #2)

Agus Suwage (Indonesian, born 1959). Tembok Toleransi #2 (Tolerance Wall #2), 2013. Screen print and paint on recycled cans, car audio system, and sound, 138 1/2 x 179 1/4 x 7 1/2 inches (351.8 x 455.3 x 19.1 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Gift of Mrs. Georgia M. G. Forman, by exchange, 2018 (2018:13a-s). © Agus Suwage

© Agus Suwage

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Agus Suwage

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Agus Suwage

Indonesian, born 1959

Tembok Toleransi #2 (Tolerance Wall #2), 2013

screen print and paint on recycled cans, car audio system, and sound

overall: 138 1/2 x 179 1/4 x 7 1/2 inches (351.79 x 455.3 x 19.05 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Mrs. Georgia M. G. Forman, by exchange, 2018

2018:13a-s

More Details

Provenance

from the artist to Tyler Rollins Fine Art, New York;
sold to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, June 26, 2018

Class

Installations (visual works)

Work Type

Installation (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

For artist Agus Suwage, the practice of creating self-portraits like Tembok Toleransi #2 (Tolerance Wall #2) is a means of exploring his long-term interest in identity and the way in which it is shaped by social and political currents. Suwage created this self-portrait, complete with his signature hat and glasses, using rectangular tiles made from colorful recycled tin cans.

In recent decades, the artist’s work has referenced and critiqued the increased repression of religious minorities in his home country of Indonesia. The small loudspeakers strung horizontally across the artist’s face in this work play chants and prayers from Indonesia’s major religions, including Christianity (the faith in which he was raised) and Islam (the religion to which he converted as an adult). The aural continuity between the various invocations creates an immersive, non-hierarchical experience of these diverse faiths. When it was first made, Tolerance Wall #2 served as a sound barrier shielding the artist’s studio from the noise of the city, including loud calls to prayer from nearby houses of worship. 

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