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Harmonics (3)

© Simone Forti. Photography © Fredrik Nilsen Studio.

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Simone Forti. Photography © Fredrik Nilsen Studio.

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Simone Forti. Photography © Fredrik Nilsen Studio.

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Simone Forti. Photography © Fredrik Nilsen Studio.

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Simone Forti

American, born Italy, 1935

Harmonics (3), 1975-1978

120º Multiplex Hologram on wooden plinth, light bulb

overall: 56 3/4 x 20 x 13 inches (144.15 x 50.8 x 33.02 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Pending Acquisition Funds, 2019

2019:2a-c

Recent Acquisition

More Details

Provenance

from the artist to The Box, Los Angeles;
sold to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, March 5, 2019

Class

Sculpture

Work Type

Sculpture (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Simone Forti was better known as an avant-garde dancer and choreographer when, in the mid-1970s, she was offered the opportunity to work with Lloyd G. Cross, a physicist and the inventor of moving holographs. In the decade prior, Forti radically reimagined dance as a democratic art form, replacing the complexities of traditional choreography with basic, everyday movements. For her collaboration with Cross, Forti performed such simple, improvisatory gestures—including standing, striding, and crawling—on a black stage. The recordings of these performances then served as the basis for a series of innovative sculptures, including Harmonics (3). Its softly flickering images of the artist walking across the stage in a figure eight and waving her arms are a composite of frames selected from Forti’s filmed performance. The process of translating this footage into the final hologram introduced “glitches” that occasionally transform the artist’s body into new and unexpected abstract forms, offering Forti further opportunities to push the limits of representing the human form. 

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