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Drift No. 2

Bridget Riley (British, born 1931). Drift No. 2, 1966. Acrylic on canvas, 91 1/2 x 89 1/2 inches (232.4 x 227.3 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1967 (K1967:5). © Bridget Riley. All rights reserved, courtesy Karsten Schubert, London.

© Bridget Riley. All rights reserved.

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Drift No. 2

© Bridget Riley. All rights reserved.

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Drift No. 2

© Bridget Riley. All rights reserved.

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Bridget Riley

British, born 1931

Drift No. 2, 1966

acrylic on canvas

support: 91 1/2 x 89 1/2 inches (232.41 x 227.33 cm); framed: 93 1/8 x 91 x 2 3/4 inches (236.54 x 231.14 x 6.99 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1967

K1967:5

More Details

Inscriptions

inscription / back, center / Drift 2 / Emulsion on canvas / 91 1/2 x 89 1/2
signature, dated / back, center / Riley '66
signature (print) / lower right outside edge / Riley
date / lower right outside edge / '66

Provenance

Richard Feigen Gallery, New York;
sold to Seymour H. Knox, Jr. for the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, February 21, 1967

Class

Paintings (visual works)

Work Type

Acrylic painting (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Since the early 1950s, Bridget Riley has continually pursued the fallibility of the human eye in the Op artworks for which she is best known. During the 1960s, Riley became increasingly interested in exploring qualities of fast and slow motion, cool and warm pigments, static and active forms, and confined and open spaces. Initially, she used a restrained approach to color. In Drift No. 2, the precisely placed, wavy, vertical lines modulate from dark to light to dark again. Overall, they appear to vibrate and sway beyond the confines of the canvas. At the end of the 1960s, a trip to Egypt inspired Riley to abandon her stark palette, and she began incorporating bands of color and mosaic-like patterns into her work.

Label from Giant Steps: Artists and the 1960s, June 30–December 30, 2018

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