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Tony's House

Edward Hopper (American, 1882–1967). Tony's House, 1926. Watercolor and pencil on paper, 13 15/16 x 19 7/8 inches (35.4 x 50.5 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Gift of Seymour H. Knox in memory of Helen Northrup Knox, Jr., 1972 (K1972:5). 

© Estate of Edward Hopper / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Tony's House

© Estate of Edward Hopper / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Tony's House

© Estate of Edward Hopper / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Edward Hopper

American, 1882-1967

Tony's House, 1926

watercolor and pencil on paper

sheet: 13 15/16 x 19 7/8 inches (35.4 x 50.48 cm); framed: 24 13/16 x 30 7/8 x 1 13/16 inches (63.02 x 78.42 x 4.6 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr. in memory of Helen Northrup Knox, 1972

K1972:5

More Details

Inscriptions

signature / lower right / Edward Hopper Gloucester

Class

Paintings (visual works)
Drawings (visual works)

Work Type

Watercolor (painting)
Drawing (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Edward Hopper’s genre paintings, which depict everyday people going about their routines, have become icons of twentieth-century life. Caught at moments of quiet reflection in offices, diners, and bedrooms, his figures seem to be in harmony with their surroundings, which function as extensions of their personalities or states of mind. The building that is the subject of Tony’s House is one such example: it stands in for the “Tony” who is named but not pictured. The modest structure, with windows opening onto its dark interior, rests quietly on an isolated lot; the neat horizontal planks of its sturdy façade contrast with the diagonal lines of the keeling electric pole and sagging brick wall. Hopper’s transformation of a domestic structure into a symbol for a particular personality ties this work to a longer history of artists using architecture as a metaphor for being human: just as we live inside our homes, we are said to live “inside” our bodies, with our eyes serving as windows onto the world.

Label from Window to Wall: Art from Architecture, November 18, 2017–March 18, 2018

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