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Blue Territory

© Estate of Joan Mitchell

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Joan Mitchell

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Joan Mitchell

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Joan Mitchell

American, 1925-1992

Blue Territory, 1972

oil on canvas

support: 103 x 71 inches (261.62 x 180.34 cm); framed: 103 1/2 x 72 x 2 1/4 inches (262.89 x 182.88 x 5.72 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1972. Conservation funded by grant from the Bank of America Art Conservation Project.

K1972:7

Currently On View

More Details

Inscriptions

signature / lower right / J. Mitchell
inscription / back / Blue Territory

Provenance

from the artist to Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, 1972;
Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1972;
donated to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, July 31, 1972

Class

Paintings (visual works)

Work Type

Oil painting (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

In 1955, Joan Mitchell began dividing her time between New York and France. She settled in Vétheuil, a small countryside town outside of Paris, in 1968 and continuously worked there until the end of her life. Impressionist Claude Monet lived and painted in this same quiet and serene location during the late 1870s. Inspired directly by Mitchell’s sense of place in Vétheuil, Blue Territory is part of her “Fields” series painted between 1971 and 1972. Here, Mitchell divided her canvas into rectangular areas of color. However, the overall composition essentially reads as a landscape. The artist has said of her work, “It comes from and is about landscape, not about me.” Throughout this composition, Mitchell built up areas of pigment—some applied in glossy, thick layers, others dissolving in thin veils and drips. Despite the richness of Mitchell’s brushwork, the gravitational pull on dribbles of paint lends this sizeable tableau a stable and somewhat serene air.

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