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Dites donc

Public Domain

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Public Domain

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Honoré Daumier

French, 1808-1879

Dites donc, 1846

lithograph

sheet: 13 3/8 x 10 1/4 inches (33.97 x 26.03 cm); overall: 19 1/4 x 13 1/2 inches (48.89 x 34.29 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of ACG Trust, 1970

P1970:1.7

More Details

Inscriptions

signature / lower left, on stone

Class

Prints

Work Type

Lithograph

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Although Honoré Daumier worked in many mediums, he is best known for his remarkably astute lithographs and produced nearly four thousand of these prints over his forty-year career. His works are frank, but often still light-hearted, depictions of everyday scenes that illuminate and critique the faults in his social environment. His earliest lithographs, inspired by the political and social tumult that defined France’s July Monarchy, first appeared in the satirical weekly paper La Caricature and the daily paper Le Charivari.

Dites donc is from one of Daumier's series illustrating the misbehaviors of the bourgeoisie, "Les Bons Bourgeois" ("The Good Bourgeois"). Here, Daumier’s chosen characters are two companions who joke that their wives are ignorant of their misbehavior. In the series as a whole, Daumier exposes the hypocrisy of such individuals and provides a look behind the prim and polished veneer of the upper middle classes.

Label from Stop Me If You’ve Heard This One: Humor and Satire from the Collection, November 19, 2016–March 19, 2017

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