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Interior

© Estate of Richard Artschwager / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Richard Artschwager / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Richard Artschwager / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Richard Artschwager

American, 1923-2013

Interior, 1972

screen print

Edition: 63/68

image: 28 1/4 x 41 inches (71.75 x 104.14 cm); sheet: 33 1/4 x 48 3/8 inches (84.455 x 122.8725 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

James S. Ely Fund, 1980

P1980:3

More Details

Inscriptions

edition notation / lower left / 63/68
signature, dated / lower right / Richard Artschwager 72

Class

Prints (visual works)

Work Type

Screen print

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

In the early 1960s, Richard Artschwager began making sculptures that look like abstracted pieces of furniture. In a parody of both painting and sculpture, he covered their surfaces with Formica, a modern industrial product used to give objects the appearance of more expensive materials, such as wood or marble. He continued to draw analogies between the “high” arts of painting and sculpture and the “low” art of interior design in a series of paintings that depict a variety of elegant domestic spaces. In each painting, rooms are filled with luxury items; on closer inspection, however, one finds no traces of everyday life. In fact, Artschwager based his images on mass-reproduced photographs—hence their grey tones—from what appear to be interior design publications. With Interior, Artschwager turns one of his paintings back into a printed image, but he breaks it into two slightly overlapping halves, as if to highlight the artificiality both of this print (which is based on a painting of a photo of the room) and of the décor itself. Ultimately, Interior suggests that elegant rooms are all “staged,” not necessarily for a photographer but to convince us of the wealth and sophistication of the people who live there. 

Label from Window to Wall: Art from Architecture, November 18, 2017–March 18, 2018

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