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Untitled (Barragan House #21)

Luisa Lambri (Italian, born 1969). Untitled (Barragán House #21), 2005. Laserchrome digital chromogenic color print, edition 3/5; 36 x 38 x 2 inches (91.4 x 96.5 x 5.1 cm), framed. Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; General Purchase Funds, 2006 (P2006:8.1). © 2005 Luisa Lambri

© Luisa Lambri

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Luisa Lambri

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Luisa Lambri

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Luisa Lambri

Italian, born 1969

Untitled (Barragan House #21), 2005

Laserchrome digital chromogenic color print

Edition: 3/5

framed: 36 x 38 x 2 inches (91.44 x 96.52 x 5.08 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

General Purchase Funds, 2006

P2006:8.1

More Details

Class

Photographs
Digital prints (visual works)

Work Type

Chromogenic color print
Laser print

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Many images of architecture depict their subjects at a distance, allowing us to better analyze their overall structure. In contrast, Luisa Lambri’s photographs, which feature buildings designed by famous architects, offer us intimate views of specific details, as in this close-up image of a window in the home of Mexican architect Luis Barragán. By emphasizing the sensuous pleasure of opening up the wooden shutters and observing the play of light and shadow, Lambri suggests that architecture is something that must be experienced to be understood. As she explained in 2014, her photographs are byproducts of her physical interactions with buildings, allowing her to interject her own perspective into the (traditionally masculine) history of architecture: "I very often take sequences of pictures in a way so that the images reflect my position in the space, or the movement, or my actions. For example I may open windows to establish a relationship with them or to relate to the space. It’s a physical thing, it’s a simple, beautiful thing to open a window and let some light in, and that very simple gesture is enough to somehow really make the place you like look more like you. So it’s about this relationship and dialogue [of] the images with architecture, with people, and with myself."

Label from Window to Wall: Art from Architecture, November 18, 2017–March 18, 2018

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