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Blue Right-angle, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York from the series Altered Landscapes

© John Pfahl

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© John Pfahl

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

John Pfahl

American, born 1939

Blue Right-angle, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York from the series Altered Landscapes, 1975

Ektacolor chromogenic color print

sheet: 8 x 10 inches (20.32 x 25.4 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Charles Clifton and Elisabeth H. Gates Funds, 2013

P2013:5.7

More Details

Inscriptions

inscription / back, lower center / ©Pfahl
date / back, lower right / September 1975
inscription / back, lower center / Blue Right-Angle (AKAG, Buffalo, NY)

Provenance

Nina Freudenheim Gallery, Buffalo;
December 10, 2013, purchased by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo

Class

Photographs

Work Type

Chromogenic color print

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

This work belong to the series “Altered Landscapes,” which helped establish longtime Buffalo resident John Pfahl as a renowned conceptual photographer. Using materials such as thread, balls, fruits, and lights, he made subtle alterations to the landscape that create optical illusions. To make Blue Right-angle, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York, Red Right-angle, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, and Yellow Right-angle, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York, Pfahl applied pieces of colored tape to the columns, walls, and floor of the neoclassical portico on the Albright-Knox’s eastern façade. When photographed from a specific vantage point, these pieces of tape form straight lines that seem to float near the surface of the photo, behind which the architecture recedes into the background. The illusion underscores the difference between real and represented space, while simultaneously drawing our attention to (and brightening up) the architecture of the museum. Although designed to serve as a container and backdrop to works of art, the museum here appears as a work of art in its own right, worthy of our close attention.  

Label from Window to Wall: Art from Architecture, November 18, 2017–March 18, 2018

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