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Fargo Frame: High Chair Fence House

Dennis Maher (American, born 1976). Fargo Frame: High Chair Fence House, 2013. Inkjet print on canvas,  64 x 44 inches (162.6 x 111.8 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; James S. Ely Fund, 2014 (P2014:5.6). © Dennis Maher

© Dennis Maher

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Dennis Maher

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Dennis Maher

American, born 1976

Fargo Frame: High Chair Fence House, 2013

inkjet print on canvas with plywood, nails, and canvas stretcher bars

support: 64 x 44 inches (162.56 x 111.76 cm); framed: 66 1/2 x 46 1/2 x 2 inches (168.91 x 118.11 x 5.08 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

James S. Ely Fund, 2014

P2014:5.6

More Details

Provenance

the artist;
October 29, 2014, purchased by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo

Class

Digital prints

Work Type

Inkjet print

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

A 2012–13 artist-in-residence at the Albright-Knox and current professor of architecture at the University at Buffalo, Dennis Maher lives in a formerly condemned property that he made into his home, studio, and workshop. By continually renovating his “Fargo House,” Maher also transformed it into a work of art that explores the connections between art and architecture, creation and destruction, and individual and collaborative work. Literally a blue-colored print, this “blueprint” of the building was created by digitally combining photographs and drawings of its structure and contents, resulting in a hallucinatory layering of fractured forms, textured surfaces, and artistic mediums. Maher then framed a print of this “house mirage,” as he calls it, in a custom wooden structure that loosely resembles a window or door. Simultaneously an image of a building, a byproduct of Maher’s recycling of architectural forms, and a piece of architecture itself, the final object challenges us to rethink how architects translate two-dimensional drawings into buildings, and how artists translate buildings into two-dimensional art. In 2016, Maher and the Albright-Knox’s Innovation Lab cofounded The Society for the Advancement of Construction-Related Arts (SACRA), which offers hands-on training in the skills necessary to preserve and continue Buffalo’s proud architectural heritage.

Label from Window to Wall: Art from Architecture, November 18, 2017–March 18, 2018

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