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Esta finca no será demolida (This property will not be demolished)

Teresa Margolles (Mexican, born 1963). Detail from Esta finca no será demolida (This property will not be demolished), 2011. One of forty chromogenic color prints, edition 5/6 plus 1 artist's proof, 27 x 40 1/2 inches (68.6 x 102.9 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Pending Acquisition Funds, 2017 (P2017:10a-nn). © 2011 Teresa Margolles

© Teresa Margolles

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Teresa Margolles

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Teresa Margolles

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Teresa Margolles

Mexican, born 1963

Esta finca no será demolida (This property will not be demolished), 2011

set of forty chromogenic color prints

Edition: 5/6 plus 1 artist's proof

each (sheet): 27 x 40 1/2 inches (68.58 x 102.87 cm); each (framed): 28 1/8 x 41 1/4 x 1 5/8 inches (71.44 x 104.78 x 4.13 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Mrs. Georgia M. G. Forman, by exchange, 2017

P2017:10a-nn

Recent Acquisition

More Details

Inscriptions

no inscriptions

Provenance

from the artist to LABOR, Mexico City;
sold to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, October 19, 2017

Class

Photographs

Work Type

Chromogenic color print
Set (group)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Esta finca no será demolida (This property will not be demolished) presents an unflinching and unromanticized view of the decaying buildings of Ciudad Juárez, a Mexican city along the United States border that has long suffered from drug-related gang violence. The title reflects the artist’s belief in the power of art to act as a memorial: Teresa Margolles began documenting the buildings before they were demolished. For the artist, the project of photographing Juárez’s buildings is an indirect means to record, without sensationalizing, the effect of prolonged violence on its residents, who struggle to operate their businesses or otherwise carry on with their lives. Like these buildings, although they may have suffered, these people, too, “will not be demolished.”

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