Skip to Main Content

Untitled

© Danh Võ

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Danh Võ

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Danh Võ

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Danh Võ

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Danh Võ

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Danh Võ

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Danh Võ

Danish, born Vietnam, 1975

Untitled, 2013

set of six photogravures

Edition: bon à tirer from an edition of 24 plus 6 artist's proofs

sheet (each): 19 3/4 x 13 3/4 inches (50.16 x 34.92 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Charlotte A. Watson Fund, by exchange, 2017

P2017:14a-f

Currently On View

More Details

Inscriptions

edition notation / on each print, back, lower right / BAT

Provenance

from the artist to Niels Borch Jensen Gallery and Editions, Copenhagen;
sold to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, December 12, 2017

Class

Photomechanical prints

Work Type

Photogravure (print)
Set (group)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

This set of six prints that take as their subject hands from some of Michelangelo’s (Italian, 1475–1564) sculptures, including classics of the Western tradition like Pietà, 1497–1500, and David, 1501–4, as seen in a series of found photographs appropriated by Danh Võ. He was quite taken by the tight cropping, which draws our attention to the details of this often overlooked element of figurative sculpture, such as the elegant way in which the slight tilt of a wrist disappears into the line of an arm, the sinuous bulge of veins, or how a centuries-old stone hand can seem shockingly intimate.

In his practice, Võ frequently employs objects that have emotional and historical significance in his explorations of how identity and values are formed and, ultimately, inherited in social and political contexts. For example, the Albright-Knox’s collection also includes a portion of the artist’s sculptural project We The People, for which he divided a full-size copper replica of the Statue of Liberty into several hundred pieces. “I don’t believe that things come from within you,” Võ commented. “To me things come out of the continuous dialogue you have with your surroundings.”

Back to Top