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Lead-Copper Plain

© Carl Andre / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Lead-Copper Plain

© Carl Andre / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Lead-Copper Plain

© Carl Andre / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Lead-Copper Plain

© Carl Andre / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Carl Andre

American, born 1935

Lead-Copper Plain, 1969

copper and lead

overall: 3/8 x 72 x 72 inches (.95 x 182.88 x 182.88 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Charles Clifton Fund, 1972

1972:15

More Details

Provenance

from the artist to John Weber Gallery, New York, 1972;
Purchased by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, February 1973

Class

Sculpture (visual work)

Work Type

Construction (sculpture)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

During the early 1960s, Carl Andre made a living working on the Pennsylvania Railroad. His daily exposure to the endless miles of track and repetitive lines of freight cars heightened his awareness of the relationship between objects and their surroundings. This became a central idea in Andre’s approach to artmaking and his designation of “sculpture as form, sculpture as structure, sculpture as place.” Lead-Copper Plain is one in a series of works the artist referred to as “plains”—which further emphasizes their function as discrete places and evokes visions of a flat, sweeping landmass. It comprises thirty-six twelve-inch-square copper and lead tiles arranged in a checkerboard pattern and held in place only by gravity. Andre maintains that it is possible to sense the differing mass of the metals and hear the contrasting sounds they make underfoot. Viewers are invited to test Andre’s theories by gently walking on this work.

Label from Giant Steps: Artists and the 1960s, June 30–December 30, 2018

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