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Untitled, from the Hannah Wilke Monument

© Marsie, Emmanuelle, Damon and Andrew Scharlatt, Hannah Wilke Collection & Archive, Los Angeles / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Untitled, from the Hannah Wilke Monument

© Marsie, Emmanuelle, Damon and Andrew Scharlatt, Hannah Wilke Collection & Archive, Los Angeles / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Hannah Wilke

American, 1940-1993

Untitled, from the Hannah Wilke Monument, 1976

colored chewing gum on cardboard mounted on painted wood

each cardboard support (10 total): 7 x 5 inches (17.78 x 12.7 cm); secondary support (wood): 16 3/4 x 27 3/4 inches (42.54 x 70.48 cm); framed: 17 3/8 x 28 3/8 inches (44.1325 x 72.0725 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of the artist, 1976

1976:10.1-10

More Details

Inscriptions

signature, dated; inscription / lower right / 4 for the 4th 1976 Hannah Wilke 10
inscription

Provenance

donated by the artist to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, September 1976

Class

Sculpture

Work Type

Construction (sculpture)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Hannah Wilke examined and challenged notions of femininity, feminism, and sexuality through her intense, unapologetic depiction of the female body. Untitled from the Hannah Wilke Monument is both the product and documentation of Wilke’s nine-hour performance called “My Country-‘tis of Thee” at the Albright-Knox on the occasion of the United States Bicentennial on July 4, 1976. The performance, in which Wilke transformed a patriotic into a matriarchic theme, involved the local community. She created three twelve-foot photographs of herself appearing bare-breasted and stoic as a goddess figure emulating Augustus Saint-Gaudens's Eight Caryatid Figures flanking the Albright-Knox’s Delaware Stairs. She then gave willing participants fruit-flavored bubble gum to chew and return to her, which she shaped into a series of abstract, organic forms affixed to index cards that were placed over the photographs. Wilke intended the vaginal shapes of these small sculptures to interrupt the viewer’s gaze and ultimately bring attention to his or her relationship with the imagery and the objectification of the female body. Decades later, Wilke’s highly personal, aggressive, and political work endures as a strong symbol that continues to confront social boundaries.

Label from One Another: Spiderlike, I Spin Mirrors, March 7–June 1, 2014

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