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Head in the Night

© Successió Miró S.L. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Successió Miró S.L. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Joan Miró

Spanish, 1893-1983

Head in the Night, 1968

bronze

Edition: 1/2

overall: 26 1/2 x 13 5/8 x 12 1/4 inches (67.31 x 34.61 x 31.11 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Charles Clifton, George B. and Jenny R. Mathews, and James G. Forsyth Funds, 1976

1976:5

More Details

Inscriptions

foundry stamp / lower left / Fundicio/Victoria/Paradella/Barcelona
signature / lower left / Miro 1/2

Provenance

from the artist to Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, by 1970;
sold to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, April 1976

Class

Sculpture (visual work)

Work Type

Cast (sculpture)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

While Joan Miró occasionally created reliefs and sculptural assemblages early in his career, it was not until the mid-1960s that they became a major part of his working practice. Throughout the following decade he produced more than two hundred sculptural objects ranging from small to monumental in size. Head in the Night is one of several early sculptures that Miró cast in bronze using the lost-wax method. The original assemblage included objects that he found in his studio or during his daily walks; tree limb that forms the body of the figure is the most recognizable of these. Miró assembled the parts spontaneously, maintaining the distinct identity of each individual component while also creating an overall composition. This work is evocative of the visual iconography of humorously imagined and mythically charged creatures and forms that Miró developed throughout his paintings and works on paper.

Label from Artists in Depth: Arp, Miró, Calder, March 25, 2011–April 15, 2012

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