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Tennis Shoe

Jim Dine (American, born 1935). Tennis Shoe, 1962. Painted tennis shoe and laces with paper collage and oil on wood, 17 1/2 x 20 x 5 inches (44.5 x 50.8 x 12.7 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Gift of Linda Hyman, 2001 (2001:14.2). © Jim Dine / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

© Jim Dine / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Jim Dine / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Jim Dine

American, born 1935

Tennis Shoe, 1962

painted tennis shoe and laces with paper collage and oil on wood

support: 17 1/2 x 20 x 5 inches (44.45 x 50.8 x 12.7 cm); framed: 19 x 21 1/2 x 5 inches (48.26 x 54.61 x 12.7 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Linda Hyman, 2001

2001:14.2

More Details

Inscriptions

signature, dated / back / Jim Dine 1962
inscription / lower right, under shoe / TENNIS SHOE

Provenance

Leon Kraushar [1913-1967], Long Island;
1967, sold by Kraushar's widow to German art collector Karl Ströher [1890-1977], Darmstadt through German art dealer, Franz Dahlem [b. 1938], Munich;
May 1989, purchased by private collector, New York, from the "Pop Art from the Collection of the Late Karl Ströher" auction, Sotheby's New York, May 2, 1989, Sale 5844 STRÖHER, lot 11;
May 2000, purchased by Linda Hyman [1940-2010], New York;
November 19, 2001, donated to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo

Class

Sculpture

Work Type

Assemblage (sculpture)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

In 1959, Jim Dine traveled to New York, where he took part in some of the city’s early Happenings—spontaneous and experiential performances in which the audience was often encouraged to participate. A year later, he began to focus more on a painterly practice that incorporated physical objects, a love of which came from working in his family’s hardware stores as a youth. He frequently affixed everyday objects, such as tools, rope, and articles of clothing, to his canvases. Here, a tennis shoe camouflaged in a layer of piggy-pink pigment emerges from the lower portion of the picture plane. While Dine is associated with the development of Pop art, he downplayed this connection in a 1966 interview, stating, “I’m not a Pop artist. . . . When I use objects, I see them as a vocabulary of feelings. I can spend a lot of time with objects, and they leave me as satisfied as a good meal. I don’t think Pop artists feel that way.”

Label from Giant Steps: Artists and the 1960s, June 30–December 30, 2018

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