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Color Ritual

© Lynda Benglis / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Color Ritual

© Lynda Benglis / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Color Ritual

© Lynda Benglis / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Color Ritual

© Lynda Benglis / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Color Ritual

© Lynda Benglis / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Lynda Benglis

American, born 1941

Color Ritual, 1971

beeswax and resin on Masonite

support: 35 x 5 x 2 inches (88.9 x 12.7 x 5.08 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Fern and Joel Levin, 2003

2003:22

Currently On View

More Details

Inscriptions

signature, undated

Class

Paintings (visual works)

Work Type

Encaustic painting (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Since the 1960s, Lynda Benglis has worked to subvert prevailing ideologies about art, gender, and the relationship between them. Best known for her iconic poured-latex “floor paintings” and sculptures made of layered wax, Benglis's  visceral practice is both performative and sensual. In the 1970s, she began to challenge the rigors of Minimalism by creating flows of hardened polyurethane, often garish or metallic in color, that seem to careen off walls. Although Benglis states these early works are about pure aesthetics and her own feminist views, she also acknowledges their relationship to the decorative flamboyance of the Mardi Gras culture in which she was raised. This culture and its ornamental elements later influenced her ideas as she “began to think of painting as a skin.” About her choice of materials, Benglis states, “They’ve all been used as a surface for human skin. Latex and rubber masks, wax effigies, and wax in ritual. I was also interested in the fact that most of these materials derive from nature.”

Label from One Another: Spiderlike, I Spin Mirrors, March 7–June 1, 2014

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