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Drawing

Nancy Rubins (American, born 1952). Drawing, 2007. Graphite on paper, 139 x 121 inches (353.1 x 307.3 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Gift of the artist and George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, by exchange, 2011 (2011:50). © 2007 Nancy Rubins.

© Nancy Rubins

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Nancy Rubins

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Nancy Rubins

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Nancy Rubins

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Nancy Rubins

American, born 1952

Drawing, 2007

graphite on paper

sheet: 139 x 121 inches (353.06 x 307.34 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of the artist and George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, by exchange, 2011

2011:50

More Details

Inscriptions

signature, dated / back, upper left / RUBIN 2007.0001

Class

Drawings

Work Type

Drawing (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Nancy Rubins is best known for her ability to transform industrially manufactured objects, such as boats, mattresses, and playground toys, into monumental, commanding installations. Stainless Steel, Aluminum, Monochrome I, Built to Live Anywhere, at Home Here, which can be found outside at the entrance to the museum, is an example of such works. Rubins’s drawings are dense, three-dimensional creations that challenge the medium’s typical association with the delicacy of line and, like her sculptures, appear to defy gravity. She covers every inch of the paper with her markmaking materials, in this case graphite, and then often folds, layers, and creases the paper. The result evokes draped fabric or crumpled metal and conveys a distinct pictorial character within its monochromatic surface sheen. At first glance, this work may appear to be weighty and steel-like. Up close, the viewer may notice the ways in which the edges of the paper curl to reveal the imperfections beneath. However, even the scuffed and smudged underside of the work radiates energy—begging us to reevaluate the transformative power of the pencil.

Label from Drawing: The Beginning of Everything, July 8–October 15, 2017

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