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Untitled (Fold)

Tauba Auerbach (American, born 1981). Untitled (Fold), 2012. Acrylic paint on canvas on wooden stretcher, 64 x 48 inches (162.6 x 121.9 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; By exchange: Charlotte A. Watson Fund and Gift of Miss Amelia E. White, 2012 (2012:19). © Tauba Auerbach. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

© Tauba Auerbach

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Tauba Auerbach

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Tauba Auerbach

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Tauba Auerbach

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Tauba Auerbach

American, born 1981

Untitled (Fold), 2012

acrylic paint on canvas on wooden stretcher

support: 64 x 48 inches (162.56 x 121.92 cm); support: 64 3/8 x 48 1/8 inches (163.51 x 122.24 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Charlotte A. Watson Fund, by exchange and Gift of Miss Amelia E. White, by exchange, 2012

2012:19

More Details

Inscriptions

signature, dated / back, upper right / Tauba Auerbach 2012

Provenance

Paula Cooper Gallery, New York;
June 19, 2012, purchased by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo

Class

Paintings

Work Type

Acrylic painting (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Throughout her career, Tauba Auerbach has been interested in juxtaposing contradictory formal elements in her paintings, exploring what arises when the mind must reconcile two competing assumptions. For example, although the surface of Untitled (Fold) appears three-dimensional, the canvas is actually stretched flat. To create this pictorial illusion, Auerbach applied paint to a folded and creased canvas. After it dried, she stretched the canvas flat, but the painted areas record the canvas’s previous three-dimensionality and folds appear to remain. This interrelationship between real and painted depth means that paintings like this one are at once representational and abstract. Auerbach’s work challenges logic by holding these contradictory states—of representation and abstraction, of flatness and dimensionality—in equilibrium.

Label from The Swindle: Art Between Seeing and Believing, May 26–October 28, 2018

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