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Path

© Andy Goldsworthy

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Andy Goldsworthy

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Andy Goldsworthy

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Andy Goldsworthy

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Andy Goldsworthy

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Andy Goldsworthy

British, born 1956

Path, 2012-2013

granite

overall (length of path): 4080 x 96 x 12 inches (10363.2 x 243.84 x 30.48 cm); overall (length of curved line of pavers): 4584 x 96 x 12 inches (11643.36 x 243.84 x 30.48 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, by exchange, Bequest of Arthur B. Michael, by exchange, Sarah Norton Goodyear Fund, Albert H. Tracy Fund, Gift of A. Conger Goodyear, by exchange, Sherman S. Jewett Fund, James H. Madison Fund, by exchange, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Robins, Jr., by exchange and Gift of Mrs. Seymour H. Knox, Sr., by exchange, 2012

2012:37

Currently On View
Collection Highlight

More Details

Inscriptions

no inscriptions

Provenance

commissioned from the artist by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, and purchased through Galerie Lelong, June 2012;
installation completed May 2013

Class

Environmental art

Work Type

Environmental art

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

This site-specific project, commissioned from artist Andy Goldsworthy by the Albright-Knox for its campus, takes the form of a gravel path set in a shaded glade on the east side of the museum. Beneath the gravel lies a snaking granite form carved by the artist. Largely invisible during dry periods, this serpentine line appears with fluctuations in temperature and precipitation, evoking a ghostly river through the woods. While the artist carried out research in advance of installing the work, he admits that “the vagaries of weather make [these changes] impossible to predict. It is also understood that the site will have a profound effect on how the work will function—the impact of which will remain unknown until the work has been . . . seen over time. These unknowns are an important part of the work and are what will make Path unique to its location.”

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