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Good World

Joe Bradley (American, born 1975). Good World, 2017. Oil on canvas, 86 1/8 x 75 inches (218.8 x 190.5 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Gift of Mrs. George A. Forman, by exchange; the Albert H. Tracy Fund, by exchange; the Charles W. Goodyear Fund, by exchange; and the George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, by exchange, 2017 (2017:2). © 2017 Joe Bradley.

© Joe Bradley

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Joe Bradley

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Joe Bradley

American, born 1975

Good World, 2017

oil on canvas

support: 86 1/8 x 75 inches (218.76 x 190.5 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

By exchange: Gift of Mrs. George A. Forman, Albert H. Tracy Fund, Charles W. Goodyear Fund and George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, 2017

2017:2

More Details

Provenance

from the artist to Gagosian Gallery, Los Angeles;
sold to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, March 7, 2017

Class

Paintings (visual works)

Work Type

Oil painting (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

For Joe Bradley, art history is a vast library of gestures and attitudes ripe for rediscovery, and throughout his wide-ranging career he has consistently engaged with the ideas and practices of his predecessors. His diverse body of work encompasses classically inflected abstractions, such as Good World, alongside more expressionistic canvases that record the detritus and spontaneity of the studio environment, prints inspired by the linework found in zines, stenographic grease-pencil drawings on drop cloth, and reimaginings of amateur sculpture.

Good World’s parallel planes of black and yellow are deceptively simple. Close examination reveals that the canvas has been painted on both sides, torn, cut, added to, crumpled, and layered. In the upper-left corner, a small flap hints at the cutting and sewing that went into making this work. Here and elsewhere in the painting, yellow, red, and blue (interrupted only by a strategic pink smudge) battle for dominance.

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