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Untitled (Men in the Cities)

© Robert Longo and Metro Pictures / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Robert Longo and Metro Pictures / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Robert Longo

American, born 1953

Untitled (Men in the Cities), 1976 (printed 2009)

set of two gelatin silver prints

Edition: 7/10

sheet (each): 20 x 16 inches (50.8 x 40.64 cm); overall: 20 x 32 inches (50.8 x 81.28 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

[See provenance for full credit line], 2010

P2010:9a-b

More Details

Inscriptions

signature, dated / back / RL '76
edition notation / back / 7/10

Provenance

Credit line: George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, Gift of Demotte and Company, by exchange, Charles Clifton Fund, by exchange, Fellows for Life Fund, by exchange, Albert H. Tracy Fund, Charles Clifton and James G. Forsyth Fund, by exchange, George Cary Fund, by exchange, Charlotte A. Watson Fund, by exchange, Evelyn Rumsey Cary Fund, by exchange, Charlotte A. Watson Fund, Gift of Thomas Robins, Jr., by exchange, Gift of Mrs. Richard J. Sherman, by exchange and Bequest of John Mortimer Schiff, by exchange, 2010

Provenance:
the artist;
sold to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery via Metro Pictures, New York, July 13, 2010

Class

Photographs

Work Type

Gelatin silver print

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Robert Longo was one of several important artists in the 1970s who pioneered new forms of art by appropriating cinema and combining it with painting, drawing, and photography. His work Untitled (Men in the Cities) was inspired, in part, by films featuring death scenes that involve a high impact, causing bodies to jerk in dramatic ways. Although Longo further developed the series after he moved with Cindy Sherman to New York in 1976, the idea originated in Buffalo around 1975. In 1976, Longo photographed his friend and Hallwalls collaborator Kevin Noble mimicking death scenes from films. Later, in New York, Longo threw things at his models to make them flinch or contort their bodies. He translated the photographs into drawings by tracing them using an overhead projector, often changing the subjects’ clothing or slightly altering their poses or body types to create, as he has said, “a kind of rhythm that translates through the body, abstract notations of movement and tension.”

Label from Wish You Were Here: The Buffalo Avant-garde in the 1970s, March 30–July 8, 2012

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