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Étude pour "Le Chahut" (Study for "Le Chahut")

Georges Seurat (French, 1859-1891). Étude pour "Le Chahut" (Study for "Le Chahut"), 1889. Oil on canvas in artist frame, 26 5/8 × 23 × 1 inches (67.6 × 58.4 × 2.54 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; General Purchase Funds, 1943 (1943:10).

Public Domain

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Public Domain

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Public Domain

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Georges Seurat

French, 1859-1891

Étude pour "Le Chahut" (Study for "Le Chahut"), 1889

oil on canvas

support: 21 3/4 x 18 1/2 inches (55.24 x 46.99 cm); framed (artist frame): 26 5/8 x 23 x 1 inches (67.63 x 58.42 x 2.54 cm); frame: 30 13/16 x 27 5/16 x 2 7/8 inches (78.26 x 69.37 x 7.3 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

General Purchase Funds, 1943

1943:10

Currently On View

More Details

Inscriptions

no inscriptions

Provenance

1891, inherited from the artist by his mother, Ernestine Seurat [1828-1899], Paris;
by March 1892, given by Mme Seurat to Paul Signac [1863-1935], Paris, and with him until at least January 1934 and probably until his death in 1935.
December 1936, to Wildenstein & Company, New York and London;
March 15, 1943, sold by Wildenstein & Company to the Albright Art Gallery, Buffalo

Class

Paintings (visual works)
Studies (visual works)

Work Type

Oil painting (visual work)
Preparatory study

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Study for Le Chahut is the larger and later of two studies Georges Seurat executed for the final painting. From the point of view of the audience, we can see the interior of a dance hall where a chorus line of performers executes cancan-style choreography. This image is exemplary of a period in which Seurat almost exclusively depicted elements of the circus and Parisian cabaret acts. In contrast to Study for La Grande Jatte, made several years earlier, Seurat’s rhythmic application of color is used here to create movement—not stifle it. Infrared photographs of this painting reveal that Seurat initially drew a grid-like network of lines on the canvas. This allowed him to develop a carefully organized treatment of the composition. Seurat even continued his brushwork onto the dark border of the painting’s frame, using it as an integral aspect of the work.

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