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Caprice

Leonard Baskin (American, 1922–2000). Caprice, 1963. Bronze, 25 x 25 1/2 x 11 3/4 inches (63.5 x 64.8 x 29.8 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Elisabeth H. Gates Fund, 1964 (1964:10). © Estate of Leonard Baskin.

© Estate of Leonard Baskin

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Leonard Baskin

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Leonard Baskin

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Leonard Baskin

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Leonard Baskin

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Leonard Baskin

American, 1922-2000

Caprice, 1963

bronze

overall: 25 x 25 1/2 x 11 3/4 inches (63.5 x 64.77 x 29.84 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Elisabeth H. Gates Fund, 1964

1964:10

More Details

Class

Sculpture (visual work)

Work Type

Cast (sculpture)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

During his lifetime, Leonard Baskin created a large body of work that ranges from Holocaust memorials to children’s book illustrations. However, no matter the presentation, Baskin always held to a singular theme: the human condition. Across various mediums, the artist developed his subjects as rough, bloated, and malformed, sometimes combining animal and human features. Both the “Bird Man” and the state of “caprice” (an unexpected change of mood or behavior) were favorite subjects, and the work presented here merges these two concepts. Upon first glance, this simultaneously comical and disturbing sculpture appears to be merely the headless, distended body of a bird. Legs, which seem to be morphing into or from human limbs, form its lower half. Yet, a wee head, beady eyes, and a pointy beak emerge above.

Label from Menagerie: Animals on View, March 11–June 4, 2017

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