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Flood

Barnaby Furnas (American, born 1973). Flood, 2007. Urethane on linen, 84 x 140 inches (213.3 x 355.6 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Sarah Norton Goodyear Fund, 2010 (2010:12). © 2007 Barnaby Furnas.

© Barnaby Furnas

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© Barnaby Furnas

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Barnaby Furnas

American, born 1973

Flood, 2007

urethane on linen

support: 84 x 140 inches (213.36 x 355.6 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Sarah Norton Goodyear Fund, 2010

2010:12

Collection Highlight

More Details

Inscriptions

no inscriptions

Provenance

the artist;
sold to a private collection through Anthony Meier Fine Arts, San Francisco, 2007;
to Anthony Meier Fine Arts, San Francisco, 2009;
sold to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, June 29, 2010

Class

Paintings

Work Type

Painting (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Drawing from myriad art historical, religious, and pop cultural references, Barnaby Furnas’s explosive paintings harness color as spectacle and convey concepts such as fear, war, love, and death. Flood is a monumental tableau from a series of works in which Furnas sought to evoke Biblical prophecies through tsunami-like swaths of crimson paint. The color red, which can suggest fear, passion, and violence, almost always appears in the artist’s work, but here it takes center stage, overtaking a bright blue sky. The vigor with which Furnas applies his medium evokes 1950s Action Painting, specifically the radical energy of Japan’s Gutai group. The artist created works such as this by spritzing, flinging, splattering, dripping, and pouring a mixture of pure pigment and urethane alongside sweeping brushstrokes. Many of the artist’s Flood paintings, including this work, also have a faint line at the top of the canvas, functioning not unlike a flash of sun. This motif is a deliberate reference to the “zips” of the Abstract Expressionist painter Barnett Newman (American, 1905–1970), who was a significance influence on Furnas’s desire to encapsulate sublime emotion in primal forms, urgent color, and simple gestures. Exuberant and expressive, Furnas’s apocalyptic beauty suggests that with destruction can also come regeneration—a redemptive vision of human society.

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