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Measuring the Circle

Ellie Ga (American, born 1976). Measuring the Circle, 2013–14. Single-channel split-screen video, sound, edition 3/3. Running time: 21 minutes, 45 seconds. Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Evelyn Rumsey Cary Fund, 2014 (2014:12.2). © 2013-2014 Ellie Ga

© Ellie Ga

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Ellie Ga

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Ellie Ga

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Ellie Ga

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Ellie Ga

American, born 1976

Measuring the Circle, 2013-2014

single-channel split-screen video, sound

Edition: 3/3

running time: 21 minutes, 45 seconds

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Evelyn Rumsey Cary Fund, 2014

2014:12.2

More Details

Provenance

the artist;
to Bureau, New York;
sold to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, 2014

Class

Video art

Work Type

Single-channel video

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Measuring the Circle belongs to series of works that Ellie Ga based on the destroyed Pharos Lighthouse of Alexandria, Egypt. Built in the 3rd century BCE, the lighthouse stood for centuries as a remarkable symbol of technological advancement and one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. On the left side of this video, Ga interweaves materials relating to the lighthouse dating back to antiquity with footage documenting her research process. On the right side, she plays an ancient Greek geometry game with cut-outs of these images, creating a visual metaphor for her attempt to fit together pieces of the lighthouse’s story. By juxtaposing story-telling and research, documentary and fiction, and personal memory and historical accounts, Ga reveals how our understanding of the present is shaped by the many ways we attempt to remember and understand the past.

Label from We the People: New Art from the Collection, October 23, 2018–July 21, 2019

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