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Still Life #20

© Estate of Tom Wesselmann / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Still Life #20

© Estate of Tom Wesselmann / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Still Life #20

© Estate of Tom Wesselmann / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Still Life #20

© Estate of Tom Wesselmann / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Still Life #20

© Estate of Tom Wesselmann / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Tom Wesselmann

American, 1931-2004

Still Life #20, 1962

mixed media

overall: 47 3/4 x 48 x 10 1/2 inches (121.29 x 121.92 x 26.67 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1962

K1962:16

Collection Highlight

More Details

Inscriptions

signature, dated / inside cabinet behind second shelf / Wesselman 62
inscription; signature, dated / back, upper left / S. L. #20 Wesselman 62 enamel paint 4' x 4'

Provenance

Green Gallery, New York;
sold to Seymour H. Knox for the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, November 14, 1962

Class

Sculpture

Work Type

Assemblage (sculpture)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Still Life #20 is part of a series of sculptural still lifes that Pop artist Tom Wesselmann began creating during the early 1960s. The left side features once-functional items that he collected and then placed in a real cabinet above part of an actual sink. The light above the faucet can be turned on or off, and the cabinet can be opened or closed. On the right, Wesselmann collaged into the composition two-dimensional representations of various types of food and drink. Above these appears a reproduction of a painting by the artist Piet Mondrian, who utilized the elements of art in their purest forms—straight lines, right angles, and primary colors—in an attempt to represent a future utopian society. Wesselmann often included reproductions of the work of other artists in his constructions to demonstrate the ways in which art was becoming integrated into the fabric of everyday life and had joined the commercial world.

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