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Study for Composition #1, #2, #3 and #4 for "Mobile Painting #17"

© Estate of Jerry Tsukio Okimoto

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Jerry Tsukio Okimoto

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Estate of Jerry Tsukio Okimoto

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Jerry Tsukio Okimoto

American, 1924-1998

Study for Composition #1, #2, #3 and #4 for "Mobile Painting #17", ca. 1963

set of four watercolors on paper mounted on board

each (sheet): 2 3/4 x 5 1/4 inches (6.99 x 13.33 cm); framed: 20 3/4 x 10 9/16 x 1/2 inches (52.7 x 26.83 x 1.27 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1963

K1963:20a

More Details

Inscriptions

inscription / back, upper right / #17
label / back, upper left / AKAG sticker [with receiving number]40.2:63
inscription / back, upper center / K63:20a Okimoto Compositional Chart for Mobile Painting #17[outlined]

Provenance

the artist to Oscar Krasner, Inc.;
sold to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, December 4, 1963

Class

Paintings
Studies

Work Type

Watercolor (painting)
Study (visual work)

Information may change due to ongoing research.Glossary of Terms

These four studies demonstrate a range of possibilities, suggested by the artist Jerry Okimoto, to reconfigure the composition of Mobile Painting #17. While at first glance Mobile Painting #17 appears to be a completely flat, tricolored surface, the blue square in fact sits in a channel in front of the red and yellow squares and can be moved left or right. An exploration of geometric form and three-dimensionality, this works is also part Okimoto's overall mission as an artist to challenge the distinction between painting, sculpture, and other traditional modes of artmaking.

Label from Giant Steps: Artists and the 1960s, June 30–December 30, 2018

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