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Orange Crush

© Larry Poons / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Photograph by Jason Mandella.

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Orange Crush

© Larry Poons / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Photograph by Jason Mandella.

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Larry Poons

American, born Japan, 1937

Orange Crush, 1963

acrylic on canvas

support: 80 x 80 inches (203.2 x 203.2 cm); framed: 82 x 82 inches (208.28 x 208.28 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1964

K1964:2

More Details

Inscriptions

no inscriptions

Provenance

the artist;
Green Gallery, New York;
sold to Seymour H. Knox, Jr. for the Albright-Knox Art Gallery with funds provided by Seymour H. Knox, April 21, 1964

Class

Paintings

Work Type

Acrylic painting (visual work)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Larry Poons rose to prominence during the 1960s Op art movement with a series of seeming monochromes whose uniform surfaces are interrupted by patterns of elliptical or circular shapes. Such imagery, which Poons based in elements of design and color theory, can have additional perceptual effects. Inspired by the popular American soft drink, Orange Crush is one of the artist’s earliest optical paintings. Although the blue-green dots across its surface initially appear as if they were arbitrarily placed, he carefully calculated their layout and made preparatory drawings. Here, the underlying pencil grid and traces of circles placed elsewhere in the final configuration remain visible. While no two viewers will have exactly the same experience when encountering this painting, the artist compels your eyes to move continually around the canvas by intentionally omitting any central focus within the work’s composition. Eventually, the dots may appear as if they are pulsating. If you were to look at a white wall immediately after staring at Orange Crush, an afterimage of their arrangement—floating in space like musical notes freed from their written score—may materialize.

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