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SK-ED

© The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Josef Albers

American, born Germany, 1888-1976

SK-ED, 1972

four-color lithograph

Edition: 21/100

image area: 13 3/4 x 13 3/4 inches (34.92 x 34.92 cm); sheet: 19 15/16 x 19 15/16 inches (50.64 x 50.64 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Frederic P. Norton, 1999

P1999:6.2

More Details

Inscriptions

signed and dated / lower right / A '72

Provenance

collection of Frederic P. Norton; donated to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, 1999

Class

Prints (visual works)

Work Type

Lithograph

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

In 1949, Josef Albers began a series he called Homage to the Square. In it he explored two primary aspects of color: its relativity and its subjectivity. Relativity refers to how our perception of a color changes based on other colors adjacent to it, and subjectivity is the way the experience of color is unique to every individual. Albers investigated these concerns in hundreds of paintings featuring either three or four nesting squares. This print echoes the composition and color choices he made in the Homage to the Square series, and similarly demonstrates the optical interactions that occur in this formula. In SK-ED, the three outermost squares appear to recede into the interior of the print; meanwhile, the brightest and smallest square seems to sit far in front, radiating outward toward the viewer. Albers’s careful attention to color interactions turned a sequence of static squares into a dynamic illusion of floating planes.

Label from The Swindle: Art Between Seeing and Believing, May 26–October 28, 2018

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