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Nu au bracelet (Nude with Bracelet)

Henri Matisse (French, 1869–1954). Nu au bracelet (Nude with Bracelet), 1940 (printed after 1945). Linoleum cut, edition: unnumbered, 12 5/8 x 9 11/16 inches (32.1 x 24.6 cm). Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Gift of Frederic P. Norton, 1999 (P1999:6.389). © Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

© Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

© Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Image downloads are for educational use only. For all other purposes, please see our Obtaining and Using Images page.

Henri Matisse

French, 1869-1954

Nu au bracelet (Nude with Bracelet), 1940 (printed after 1945)

linoleum cut

Edition: unnumbered

image area: 9 9/16 x 6 15/16 inches (24.29 x 17.62 cm); sheet: 12 5/8 x 9 11/16 inches (32.07 x 24.61 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of Frederic P. Norton, 1999

P1999:6.389

More Details

Inscriptions

chop mark / lower center / Musee Louvre

Provenance

collection of Frederic P. Norton;
donated to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, 1999

Class

Prints

Work Type

Linocut (print)

This information may change due to ongoing research. Glossary of Terms

Henri Matisse approached printmaking with a toolbox of techniques that enabled him to explore the medium to its fullest potential. To create a linocut, an artist carves the design out of a piece of linoleum mounted on a wood block. Matisse was drawn to this particular method because it allowed him to easily create curvilinear and geometric forms. The abbreviated shapes and simplified composition at play in this particular image anticipate his bolder works of the later 1940s and early 1950s, in which he simultaneously represents form and space through even more streamlined, nearly sculptural silhouettes. Additionally, the white lines in this work, which denote areas where Matisse carved into the linoleum, appear as if they have been sliced into black paper—a visual prophesy of processes to come. 

Label from Matisse and the Art of Jazz, January 20–July 1, 2018

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